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  • AN UNSCIENTIFIC POLL

    Filed at 2:06 pm under by dcobranchi

    Curiosity has got the best of me. Let’s run a poll of our own. Please respond via comment below (anonymously is fine). And, feel free to pass the permalink (http://www.cobranchi.com/archives/002862.html) along. The more the merrier.

    From the list of reasons, below, please pick the single most important reason why you chose to homeschool:

    1) Religious
    2) Better education
    3) Safety (concerns about drugs, gangs, socialization, etc.)
    4) Wanted to be around your kids more
    5) Other (please specify)

    187 Responses to “AN UNSCIENTIFIC POLL”


    Comment by
    Bev
    April 19th, 2004
    at 10:53 am

    2 and 4–I can do better than any school out there, and I don’t want someone else doing it for me! I don’t want to miss a single thing about my children, from watching them take their first steps to watching them calculate their first triangular area. Their my kids, and their education is MY job!!


    Comment by
    Samantha
    April 19th, 2004
    at 11:05 am

    We move frequently (military family) and I didn’t want my children having to change schools every year. We don’t get to choose what area we live in, and therefore I wouldn’t have a lot of control over what schools district we put our children in. This was my initial reason. Since then my reasons have grown. More time with my children, better social environment, personalized education, the benefits are overwhelming.


    Comment by
    Phil
    April 19th, 2004
    at 11:52 am

    Primarily #2, better education.

    We continue because of #3 (we choose how to teach our kids about Sex Ed, Drugs, morals, etc.), #4, #5 (flexibility) and #1 (religion).

    In our case (atheists) we found the kids in the PS to be too religiously intolerant. Also, the school’s complete escewing of all things religious means that history cannot properly be taught. So yeah, we homeschool for religious reasons, but it’s not the ones the HSLDA means.


    Comment by
    Krista Young
    April 19th, 2004
    at 1:15 pm

    Primarily because of number two, but also numbers 3, 4, and 5. Also to a degree number 1, but because we are non-Christian, not because we ARE Christian.


    Comment by
    Anonymous
    April 19th, 2004
    at 1:24 pm

    No.2


    Comment by
    Cristy
    April 19th, 2004
    at 1:52 pm

    #4 main reason, sending my kids away to be raised by strangers most of their waking hours was not an option, and I’ll ditto again this one:

    #5. Freedom – for my kids, and for our family to live and learn in a way that suits us

    Basically, I don’t want to turn the control of my family…what my children learn, who they associate with, when we can vacation, what they do with their free time…over to strangers/the government


    Comment by
    Linda
    April 19th, 2004
    at 3:00 pm

    #2 was our initial reason – but after truly looking at our schools #3 (safety) became an increasingly motivating factor. Tie that in with the lack of true socialization found only in an institutional school (When was the last time you spent all day everyday with people the same age?) Religion had little to no motivating factors – except perhaps the lack of morals, namely “Do unto others…”


    Comment by
    Jennifer Parr
    April 19th, 2004
    at 3:46 pm

    Reasons 2 & 3: I do not think that teachers should be “teaching to the test”, as they do in our local school system. I also want to follow my child’s interests/stengths/weaknesses. I currently homeschool 2 of my dds, next year I will be adding another dd to the mix…she just happens to have autism. I KNOW that I can teach her, and my other girls, better than a public school teacher can, because we will follow their interests, and focus on what “works” for EACH child. The WAY children learn is so important, and unfortunately learning styles can not be adopted for each child in a typical classroom.

    And I chose #3 as a close second because I just didn’t like my 2nd grader coming home with misinformation, and embarrassment, about penises and vaginas that she got from “age appropriate schoolmates”.

    And what a surprise to find that we continue to homeschool mostly for reason #4…we found that (shock and surprise)…we actually ENJOY being around our kids! **Amazing, I know!** 😎


    Comment by
    Anonymous
    April 19th, 2004
    at 5:06 pm

    Reasons 2, 3, and 4


    Comment by
    sg
    April 19th, 2004
    at 5:39 pm

    I began homeschooling because my husband and I were dissatisfied with the academic quality of education. My youngest son was falling between the cracks and if I hadn’t done something, he would’ve given up and become a statistic. Since we’ve been hsing, his self-esteem has improved greatly and he is no longer stressed out from teachers expecting too much from him. My oldest loves the freedom with which he can pursue anything at all that catches his interest. Safety I would say runs a close 2nd. I did not want to be at home, turn on the news, and see another Columbine happening, and have it be my kids’ school this time. No, no, no. It’s better this way!


    Comment by
    donna wheaton
    April 19th, 2004
    at 5:47 pm

    #4 and #3 for starters-however, #5 is most important to me-stop torturing young minds into disfunctional adults !


    Comment by
    Caroline
    April 19th, 2004
    at 7:47 pm

    #3…negative socialization.


    Comment by
    drublood
    April 19th, 2004
    at 9:34 pm

    because it’s absurd to hand over parenting to the state at the arbitrary age of 5-7 years old.


    Comment by
    Phyllis
    April 19th, 2004
    at 10:44 pm

    compulsory education doesn’t work
    my child learns best with a child lead approach


    Comment by
    lehua
    April 19th, 2004
    at 10:56 pm

    number 2, completely


    Comment by
    Linda
    April 20th, 2004
    at 12:23 am

    Mostly number two! Which in our area is related to number three! Most days number four also, but there are the days when we’ve had enough of each other too. 😛


    Comment by
    Bill Ellis
    April 20th, 2004
    at 9:03 am

    #2
    There is not other reason for learning than learning. Schools are inefficient. But that does not mean that they can be part of a learning process. BUT are are LEARNING ALL OF THE TIME — from birth to death from waking to sleeping. It’s what makes us human. It should be the center of our lives. It should be life-long self-learning.


    Comment by
    Bill Ellis
    April 20th, 2004
    at 9:03 am

    #2
    There is not other reason for learning than learning. Schools are inefficient. But that does not mean that they can be part of a learning process. BUT are are LEARNING ALL OF THE TIME — from birth to death from waking to sleeping. It’s what makes us human. It should be the center of our lives. It should be life-long self-learning.


    Comment by
    Julie Franks
    April 20th, 2004
    at 11:40 am

    We started homeschooling primarily for lifestyle reasons. I wanted to be in control of our schedules. I wanted us to sleep when we needed rest and be active or outdoors when we needed that. I wanted our evenings to be free to spend as a family, not working on more school work. I wanted us to be able to explore- museums, parks, whatever- when we wanted to.

    Since bringing my boys home 4 years ago, I could agree with each of the other reasons.


    Comment by
    Tabitha
    April 20th, 2004
    at 1:18 pm

    better education–since the public school system had let me down as a student when I was younger why would I put my own children through that? Had I had a brain I would have quit school at 12–the unschooling I did for myself after school taught me more than all my years of public school put together….I want my children to love learning–not have their spirits destroyed…


    Comment by
    Lisa Stephenson
    April 20th, 2004
    at 2:19 pm

    2, 3, 4 & 5 (5 being freedom in our case)

    I used to work for the Tx. House of Reps. It was during this time that the Robin Hood law was passed. Twelve years and 2 kids later, I got a taste of that Robin Hood plan in the VERY SMALL ps in Central TX. I could never, in my heart, send my kiddos back into that environment.


    Comment by
    Bernadette
    April 20th, 2004
    at 4:54 pm

    5) It seemed like the natural thing to do.


    Comment by
    Karen Derrick Davis
    April 20th, 2004
    at 9:25 pm

    4,2,3,1
    In that order.

    By religion, I mean, I want to expose my kids to more religions than just Christianity.


    Comment by
    Lisa L.
    April 20th, 2004
    at 10:16 pm

    All the reasons as well as having been subjected to bullying and treated like a misfit, I want my children to be in an environment where they are edified and treated with dignity and respect. In turn, they will respond to others with that same respect, as they mature in their faith and doctrine.


    Comment by
    J Aron
    April 21st, 2004
    at 7:34 pm

    sorry so late – with a response

    Mine would be 2,3,4 and 5 (#5 reason being my kids wanted to)

    I also felt a homeschool curriculum would not be the socially engineered politically correct garbage.. and my father was absolutely furious that when my son in middle school and was studying WW2 that he was learning how awful we were to the Japanese and how wrong it was to bomb Hiroshima.. they never told the kids about the Bataan Death March or Rape of Nanking et al.. all the revisionist history was enough to make you ill (that is when they teach history at all) Oh and let’s not forget what a hero Neville Chamberlain was..blech..
    They also treated every child as if they were mentally ill.. all kinds of remediation and mom and pop psychology used in class..(let’s all stand around in a circle and fall back on each other to learn trust.. or let’s talk about our feelings today… did mommy and daddy do anything dishonest this week? Did you do something that you are ashamed of?) My kids told me they wanted out and were tired of their privacy being invaded as well as their lives being monopolized by school..


    Comment by
    Cielymar
    April 21st, 2004
    at 11:32 pm

    First for #4. My child is three and a half and the idea of sending him to preschool,or kindergarden for that matter, was a terrifing idea. Seeing neigborhood children struggle with schools and teacher, I thought there had to be another option and homeschool was it. After seeing the options we had by doing HS #2 was the reason why we decided that HS was the way to go. We are catholics and visit church often but that wasn’t a reason for HS since public schools don’t do religion either.


    Comment by
    Kimberly
    April 22nd, 2004
    at 1:21 pm

    I would have to say all of the above! We are not “religious”, per se, but I consider the spiritual/moral development of our children important, and I do not like what I see in this respect in the schools.

    Better education: yes, not only wrt “curriculum” (we are free to explore a far wider variety of “subjects”/areas, and at whatever level fits us, wheras I have found the school curriculums really simplistic and “dumbed-down”) But also wrt method/approach (hands on, relevant, holistic/integrated, relaxed VS busy/paperwork, disconnected, fragmented, irrelevant, contrived stress). I want my children to love learning for life, think with complexity and independently, and develop an inner locus of control. The schooling approach serves none of these goals, imo, and, in fact, works actively against them.

    Safety; of course. There is a great deal that is dangerous in many schools, from gang activity to bullies to toxic exposures to terrorist targeting to the food they serve (just kidding on that last one, sort of;)

    Wanted to be around my kids more; Absolutely! This is probably the single most important, if I had to pick one, and it ties in with all the others.

    Other; I agree 100% with the poster who listed the current police state of the schools/political reasons! The fear of/threat of violence/crime in the schools has been used to justify/gain acceptance of a very disturbing approach.

    The surrender of personal rights and privacy (including random searches and seizures from locker searches to drug testing/ cameras in the halls, classrooms, restrooms/ lack of freedom of expression from censorship of student press/politics to dress and hair codes to bans on personal religious or political symbols and expressions/ metal detectors, see-through backpacks, cops on campus, and the policy of treating often mild to moderate misbehavior as crimes with arrests and prosecutions/etc…

    How are children who spend most of their waking childhood in such a system supposed to develop any awareness or appreciation of the fundamental rights/responsibilities our Constitution and Bill of Rights ensure? Or be able to function as free citizens when they reach the age of 18 and beyond?

    I suspect this is not merely an unfortunate side effect, but an active agenda; They are NOT “supposed to” develop into free citizens, but into a passive/accepting work/consumer force.

    Considering the adult/outside of school population has been being increasingly subjected to the same process, I really fear for our society/nation, esp. after a few generations of 12 yr long conditioning in the schools!

    Further, I accept that children “belong to” the family, not the state, and that a compulsory school system operated by the state is a dangerous entity in a society/political system which relies upon freedom, independent thinking, and diversity for its continuation.
    There should be no “standardized curriculum” in such a diverse nation; it should not be a crime to impart your values/beliefs/interpretations of truth/skills to your children because they are considered by the majority and/or the state “wrong”, subversive, useless, whatever.

    Bottom line, there are simply so many reasons to avoid school, I cannot limit myself toany ONE!


    Comment by
    Anonymous
    April 23rd, 2004
    at 9:37 am

    We chose to home school because the schools in our area are dismal and we wanted to provide a classic education for our children. #2

    However, additional benefits are a closer family, nicer kids and additional opportunities for internships, volunteering and pursuing individual interests.


    Comment by
    mary
    April 23rd, 2004
    at 10:30 am

    #5 My son hated school. I used to teach and I knew all the failings of the school system and how they squelched the natural desire to learn but thought that if I stayed involved and encouraged him to pursue his interests at home it would be ok. I was wrong.
    Now it’s all the reasons above–the religious reason in our case was that in our small, conservative, midwestern town it is assumed that we are all Christians. That bugged me when he was in school but is not why I took him out.


    Comment by
    Sarah
    April 24th, 2004
    at 1:31 am

    We home school our daughter because of #1. We recognize our ultimate responsibility to God for her spiritual growth and feel we should not abdicate that responsibility to others. The other 3 reasons are all good, but #1 is the main reason we are still homeschooling after 7 years and plan to homeschool thru highschool.


    Comment by
    Kathy
    April 27th, 2004
    at 11:26 am

    #2 Specifically, I wanted to retain the love of learning (and reading) that I see in kindergartners, which is somehow mangled by the time students reach junior high. Even the best students only want to know what they need to do to get their “A”, not what they are going to be able to learn.


    Comment by
    Kim
    April 28th, 2004
    at 10:24 am

    I want my children to learn things THEY are interested in WHEN they are interested and not before or after. I know them better than anyone else and can offer them opportunities for learning given each of their individual preferences. Also, how can one teacher really BE with a roomful of 20 or more students. Children don’t need to be raised by each other in my opinion. I guess the reasons are to big to put in one number but I really like Andrea’s answer. 🙂


    Comment by
    amanda
    April 28th, 2004
    at 1:26 pm

    #2 encompasses a whole gamut of motivations for our family. I teach high school part time as I homeschool, and my husband works full time for the school district. It is my strong opinion that public school is not the best way of educating any child, not just my own. I see myself as here to try to make a difference for the children who have no choice in how they are educated. Even the students who excel learn many negative patterns of learning and socializing. We see the “underbelly” so to speak of the educational system, and in a small school district are faced with a good teacher for one year, pulling them out the next, etc. Of course, we also want to bring up our children with the Christian values that we think are so important, and we want to be able to protect them a little longer from the “hidden curriculum” that pervades the public school system…sex, drugs, violence, dishonesty, etc.


    Comment by
    Christine
    April 28th, 2004
    at 2:27 pm

    2..and in particular, I didn’t want him showing up in college as the kind of student I was teaching (grin). 4, 3…The popular culture is going to ‘get’ the kids to some degree or another, but free of the relentless, negative peer pressure at school we can give them room to learn their own minds.


    Comment by
    L. Coleman
    May 6th, 2004
    at 9:05 am

    We are interest led learners, and my daughter’s interest is going to school. I have two reasons why I wish we were still homeschooling in addition to the other excellent reasons listed above. First, I hate the way schools wind kids up with anxiety to take the state mandated tests. I also hate the rules about truancy. A child who is sick often is penalized if s/he stays home too many days.
    She learns to ignore symptoms of illness, take a medication, and soldier on. This is not healthy at all!


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