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  • “High Quality” Day Care

    Filed at 2:22 pm under by dcobranchi

    While walking through the George Washington University campus before, I noticed a group of infants and toddlers in “high quality” day care (I think they were from the International Monetary Fund building). About a half-dozen infants were parked in strollers, crying or otherwise looking unhappy. Three or four toddlers were running about while the two “caregivers” yelled for them to stop. And then there was an infant–he looked about seven or eight months old–sitting on the ground, crying profusely, and holding up his arms. Now I’m no child psychologist, but I’d say the little guy wanted to be picked up and held. The two “caregivers” were standing right next to him, but they wouldn’t acknowledge him, much less pick him up. I suspect they don’t pick up crying babies as a rule: After all, if they do it for one baby, they have to do it for all of them, and chaos would ensue. Better to let the infant tough-it-out by himself on the ground. It’s good preparation for being ignored in school.

    Just remember, when the politicians talk about more money for daycare, this is what they’re talking about.

    9 Responses to ““High Quality” Day Care”


    Comment by
    Kim
    August 18th, 2004
    at 2:45 pm

    Ugh. It is heartbreaking! I think when they talk about more money for daycare funding one of the things they look to improve is the teacher to child ratio. If there were 4 teachers in that room, chances are one or two of those babies would get held. Training might get better. Teachers might get paid more and have more vested in their jobs. It could help a little. But I think it is like public school in a way. Any money is just a band aid sent to patch up something that’s broken on a deepr level. I’ve given serious thought to the matter, and the only solution I can think of is if daycares/nannies and childcare workers were college students being given partial or all tuition reimbursement from the families of the children and the gov’t.The trick would be training. That way it isn’t a trickle down system, where a full grown woman is taking care of others kids so that they can make more money and give her less. I once met a nanny in my park who was working past 7pm at night with her two charges. She then told me that my son reminded her of her boy, who is 4 and was still back home in Poland. I couldn’t help but want to cry for her. Every day she is raising another couples’ children while hers are raised far away. She said it is pretty common around these parts.


    Comment by
    Joanne the Happy HSer
    August 18th, 2004
    at 2:48 pm

    Go here for commentary on daycare and homeschooling.

    robert...ne.us/


    Comment by
    Rikki
    August 18th, 2004
    at 3:44 pm

    Daycares scare the bejeebers out of me. I barely let family members watch my children *now* when they are 8, 10, and 12, there is no way I ever could have been able to use a daycare center when they were younger.


    Comment by
    Chris
    August 18th, 2004
    at 4:03 pm

    However, parents will never pay the rates necessary to fund 4 teachers per room. Daycare is not a high margin business. The liability insurance, capital costs, and operational costs are very high. Turnover among teachers is brutal. My wife did it for a few years prior to us having kids.

    In fact, I would say that experience was instrumental in our decision to have her stay home with the kids!


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    August 18th, 2004
    at 5:10 pm

    parents will never pay the rates necessary to fund 4 teachers per room

    OTOH, they’ll be more than happy to let everyone else pay for it for them. “Free” babysitting for all!


    Comment by
    Mike Peach
    August 18th, 2004
    at 5:44 pm

    There was a programme here recently that went into nurseries undercover it was v. scary

    Failings in private nurseries that had been previously approved by Ofsted inspectors have been uncovered, in an investigation by BBC One.
    Verbal abuse of toddlers, breaches in basic hygiene and under-staffing were all secretly filmed by a BBC reporter posing as a volunteer.

    news.b...04.stm

    Even more scary was the parent interviewed afterwards who said he had no problem sending his child to the worst nursery highlighted AFTER watching the programme.


    Comment by
    Laura
    August 18th, 2004
    at 6:16 pm

    Welfare reform = babies in daycare.

    There’s no way around it.


    Comment by
    Roy W. Wright
    August 18th, 2004
    at 8:59 pm

    How about adoption?


    Comment by
    Laura
    August 18th, 2004
    at 9:57 pm

    Most people don’t want to give up their children. I don’t think we’re to the place in this country where we would forcibly adopt out the children of those who can’t afford to be at home with them.