Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » SO BAD IT’S GOOD
  • SO BAD IT’S GOOD

    Filed at 7:16 am under by dcobranchi

    The Holland Sentinel published a Op/Ed that is so anti-homeschooling it is almost a parody. Really. I found myself laughing at some of the crazy assertions:

    We don’t allow people to play doctor or nurse without a license, nor can one play lawyer without passing some rather rigorous tests. But today, anyone who wants to “play school” can do so, regardless of their educational background.

    …There are other losses, such as never being “on the team,” never cheering for “our school,” never being in a class where the interaction of ideas is more important than the text, or doing any of the myriad of things that make up the process of “belonging,” from the first day of school to the 50th class reunion. There is far more to an education than a curriculum — it includes summer break, Friday nights and graduation.

    …A recent Harvard study following home-schooled children over many years found that these children did not do better at the college level than traditionally educated children.

    I’m pretty sure that last one was made from whole cloth; “A Harvard study” always sounds impressive. You really ought to read the rest. But not while your drinking anything. (via Beverly Hernandez)

    16 Responses to “SO BAD IT’S GOOD”


    Comment by
    Chris
    September 14th, 2004
    at 7:48 am

    That is one seriously demented person.


    Comment by
    Eric Holcombe
    September 14th, 2004
    at 9:06 am

    “One of the best and brightest moves that our Founding Fathers made was to make it possible for all children in America, not just the rich, to be educated. Eventually, all children were expected to attend….This public education still is the very cornerstone of democracy”

    Demented, and apparently educated by the g-schools.

    “Is this education, or programming?”

    Indeed.


    Comment by
    meep
    September 14th, 2004
    at 11:12 am

    So why are we allowing teachers who don’t know their subject material to teach? Why aren’t we requiring them to get degrees in English, Science, Math, whatnot as opposed to Education? Why are curricula being dictated by political interest groups, who have no expertise in either education or the subject matter?

    It’s pretty easy to turn it back on the public schools.


    Comment by
    CED
    September 14th, 2004
    at 11:31 am

    “There is more to education than the curriculum” Let me guess, the Harvard study, the same university that admits more home schooled students than public schooled students, showing that home schooled chirren’ did as well as other children relied on grades, in other words, the curriculum.

    It’s also interesting that the author conflates the concept of “freedom” with “obligation.” Yes, the Afghanis should have the freedom to set up community schools just as they ought to have the freedom to teach their childen at home.

    And my last sad observation is that people really do believe that the bread and circus aspect of schools, such as proms and football games are a part of education and as such are “rights” and therefore you have the moral obligation to turn over your hard earned money in the form of taxes so that they can have their “education.” Toto, we are not in Kansas anymore.


    Comment by
    Roy W. Wright
    September 14th, 2004
    at 12:08 pm

    We don’t allow people to play doctor or nurse without a license, nor can one play lawyer without passing some rather rigorous tests.

    I like how it’s dogmatically accepted that forcing medical and legal credentialing is a good thing, and violates no one’s freedoms.


    Comment by
    Roy W. Wright
    September 14th, 2004
    at 12:34 pm

    Also,

    What happens when they enter the world and cannot control everything, as they do in their sheltered home environment? What an ego trip for a parent… to control every thought, every concept that enters their world.

    Wait, I’m confused. Who’s doing the controlling?

    What an ego trip for a parent…

    Yes, and how terrible of us to deny it to the public school teachers.

    Is this education, or programming?

    If it’s programming, I want to be the one doing it.

    I have met and talked with a variety of [public school teachers]. Many have great gaps in their knowledge. Many are incredibly naive.

    Changing the words a little, these statements are just as plausible (if not more).

    Remember that the school day is only six hours long, five days a week. That leaves many hours during the week and summer for the parent.

    Reminds me of some of the justifications for taking an ever-increasing share of a person’s income.

    A… study… found that these children did not do better at the college level than traditionally educated children… How unfair it is for you to take away your own child’s life in order to gratify yours?

    Er… huh? I thought the children “did not do better.” So what, exactly, has been taken away? This op-ed is the most stunning example of broken logic that I’ve seen in a long while.


    Comment by
    CED
    September 14th, 2004
    at 1:04 pm

    “that leaves plenty of time to be a parent.”

    I only school about six hours a day as well. That leaves the government plenty of time to get its messages to my child via PBS. If time after school counts as full time parenting for me, then why can’t that same time slot as full time public education for the government?

    I’d like to post an article about what’s at the end of this slippery slope but I’m not familiar with how to do that.

    It’s called “Schools replace Churches” but just as easily could be called “Schools Replace Families.” On the bright side, I’m sure they’ll allow us alternating weekends with the kids.
    educat...558991


    Comment by
    Chris
    September 14th, 2004
    at 4:02 pm

    That is a frightening article Carrie. And it definately could happen here too.


    Comment by
    Andrea R
    September 15th, 2004
    at 12:28 pm

    I hope the article she was citing wasn’t this one because clearly, it’s such a farcical spoof I can’t believe she’d believe it.


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    September 15th, 2004
    at 12:32 pm

    The folks over at NHEN are convinced she was. I’m not so sure.


    Comment by
    Don
    September 15th, 2004
    at 12:38 pm

    There are other losses, such as never being “on the team,” never cheering for “our school,” never being in a class where the interaction of ideas is more important than the text, or doing any of the myriad of things that make up the process of “belonging,”

    How about never “standing in line”, never “being bored because the teacher is too busy with the slower students” and never having to “stop studying a subject you’re really interested in, because it’s time to do the next subject”?

    The author of the article has the same mindset as the school district administrator we met with when we took my son out of school. She said to us, “It’s our responsibility to make sure that your son is getting a good education”. Uh, no. We’re the parents, so ultimately it is our responsibility.


    Comment by
    Roy W. Wright
    September 15th, 2004
    at 2:45 pm

    Margaret “Peggy” Boyce apparently has a history of faulty logic. I Googled around to find out more about her and came across this article, in which she supports her local government in restricting the use of private property. She says, “It is necessary to have plans approved, and the owner must do just what was promised during the construction period. Sometimes the commission will have some very helpful ideas to share concerning the design. Any changes must be brought before the commission, but usually changes are easily approved.”

    In the very next paragraph, she says, “I must confess that I first applied to become a member of the commission because… I thought that no one should be telling me what to do with my own property.”


    Comment by
    lisa
    September 15th, 2004
    at 11:22 pm

    …what about my kid’s rights not to be bullied by classmates, humiliated by teachers, and rights to be treated with respect and dignity…?


    Trackback from
    O'DonnellWeb
    September 14th, 2004
    at 8:02 am

    Best.Anti-Homeschool.Editorial.Ever

    Daryl found this anti-homeschool editorial that is amazing. She has absolutely every fact wrong. To be that wrong exhibits a…


    Trackback from
    TulipGirl
    September 16th, 2004
    at 8:53 am

    And the Winner is. . .

    This article is vying for the distinction of being the Worst Homeschool Article Ever. Though, a close runner up might be this one. Some gems from Peggy Boyce’s Home-schooling Robs Children: What an ego trip for a parent — to…


    Trackback from
    O'DonnellWeb
    September 16th, 2004
    at 3:43 pm

    Best.Anti-Homeschool.Editorial.Ever

    Daryl found this anti-homeschool editorial that is amazing. She has absolutely every fact wrong. To be that wrong exhibits a…