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BOO HOO

Filed at 9:21 am under by dcobranchi

I didn’t realize that Christians, in particular evangelicals, were so discriminated against. Maybe we need affirmative action?

6 Responses to “BOO HOO”


Comment by
Suzi
December 22nd, 2004
at 5:58 pm

As an evangelical Christian, I can tell you that there is much more discrimination, both for and against, than anyone who is not one would expect. Some places will hire you because of your beliefs. Some places won’t hire you because of your beliefs. I’ve been laughed at, ridiculed, and pointed out as being foolish for my beliefs in places which clearly state that they don’t discriminate on the basis of religion. If it were a race-related insult, the resulting lawsuits would have been huge. But the actors knew they wouldn’t be sued for religious discrimination because “Christians are the majority” and therefore they can’t be discriminated against.

It’s an interesting life out there for a Christian in the US right now. Still safe, but much more interesting than it used to be.


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
December 22nd, 2004
at 8:24 pm

This is my church. They don’t come much more evangelical than BVBC.


Comment by
darby
December 23rd, 2004
at 12:39 am

I once put out a question on a very mixed homeschooling board, asking whether people felt discriminated against, either by Evangelical Christians or because they were Evangelical Christian.

The response was very interesting. 99 percent were Americans. Many non-Christians/liberal Christians/non-religious folks felt VERY oppressed by what they saw as an Evangelical Christian powerbase in the US, led by the president. The Evangelical Christians, on the other hand, felt very oppressed by what they saw as a rising tide of secularism in popular culture.

So basically everyone was sitting around saying they felt oppressed by each other. None of them felt completely welcome in American society as a whole. They all felt that they were struggling against some kind of tidal wave of popular opinion, though they couldn’t agree on whether society was getting religiously fundamentalist or secularly humanistic.

Honestly, I’m not going to try to say who started it, or whose oppression is worse. I just couldn’t help thinking that there is something incredibly absurd about the whole situation.


Comment by
darby
December 23rd, 2004
at 12:45 am

P.S. Suzi, life is also very interesting (and not particularly safe) for Wiccans in the southern US right now.
They don’t have any more legal recourse than you do, really. They lose their kids to social services, get fired from jobs, can’t buy homes, etc… and all because of their religion.

Discrimination on the basis of religion (Muslims, for example) goes on all the time, unfortunately.


Comment by
Tim Haas
December 23rd, 2004
at 8:37 am

I’ve noticed the same thing Darby has — everybody seems to feel oppressed. Thank you, century of school-delivered socialism lite, for slowly drowning character with waves of sniveling victimology.


Comment by
Tad
December 23rd, 2004
at 12:59 pm

Tim, I have to challenge your description, “century of school-delivered socialism lite.” There is nothing “lite” about it. $400 Billion per year is not ‘low fat’ or ‘sugar free.’ Especially when there is no correlation between dollars spent and results achieved.