Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » LOVE IT OR HATE IT

LOVE IT OR HATE IT

Filed at 7:23 am under by dcobranchi

I honestly can’t tell about this profile of an HE grad who is finishing up his undergraduate degree. A couple of strange quotes:

“I’m probably criminally under-socialized,” he said.

“I had really poor socialization skills when I entered my teen years. Fortunately, I had relatively painless lessons and learned quickly to be more understanding, nice and talk a lot less and listen more.

…Dell acknowledges preconceived notions that many have about home-schooled students saying, “Most of the time their notions are correct.”

9 Responses to “LOVE IT OR HATE IT”


Comment by
Jema
March 29th, 2005
at 9:18 am

I guess he doesn’t realize that those lessons would have been infinitely more painful in a public school setting. Children don’t have poor social skills from being educated at home, home education keeps children with poor social skills from being tortured in school. I daresay most of those kids would have poor social skills no matter where they were. Some children are just that way. I know I was!


Comment by
maryalice
March 29th, 2005
at 9:28 am

I think he has a sense of humor. His comments are the typical sarcasm (and arrogance) of youth.


Comment by
speedwell
March 29th, 2005
at 10:27 am

“I’m probably criminally under-socialized…. I had really poor socialization skills when I entered my teen years. Fortunately, I had relatively painless lessons and learned quickly to be more understanding, nice and talk a lot less and listen more.”

And that’s what I would say about my time in public schools, if you take “lessons” as being of the academic type.


Comment by
Tim Haas
March 29th, 2005
at 12:10 pm

I agree with MA — I can hear the strains of his toying with an overly earnest reporter.


Comment by
Chris Elam
March 29th, 2005
at 3:31 pm

I think this kid is probably being honest. There’s no need to look for subtle ironies and humor in his words.

Since I’m probably one of a VERY few commenters on this site who WAS homeschooled K-12, I can sympathize with what this young man says, and applaud his honesty. Since none of the authors of this blog have personally experienced the emotions and thought processes of a young, k-12 homeschooled child… listen up to what this young man says, and learn some pitfalls to watch out for with your own children.

I had to learn very quickly in college, to shut up and listen. And many friends who had been life-long homeschoolers have expressed similar sentiments. Homeschool kids have been encouraged their whole lives to talk more and more… a trait that will not suit them well in the real world, in college, or at their first job. Its a trait that takes a long time and a lot of painful embarrassment to overcome.

Homeschool kids are notoriously unsympathetic to real world problems of peers when they first enter the real world.

Regarding his comments about homeschool friends who “cannot stand certain people”… he is exactly on the mark. Its ridiculous how cliquish homeschoolers become even after graduating high school.

I’ve said it myself many times, and I’m glad to see another life-long educated homeschooler echoing my sentiments – Homeschoolers often earn the stereotypes.

However, it IS true to say that there are many homeschool children with poor social skills who would do just as badly in a public school setting. That’s just another fact of life, but in a homeschool setting, these children are rarely, if ever, forced to work on overcoming their deficiencies, and are often set on the path of least resistance. Its a crime to see how many bright homeschool kids I grew up with, are now in their 20’s and still working at Blockbuster or flipping burgers while living with Mom & Dad.


Comment by
Tim Haas
March 29th, 2005
at 7:05 pm

I actually appreciate your thought-provoking comments here, Chris — I’d even like you to be more specific if you have the time — but given your general volubility, this struck me as very funny:

I had to learn very quickly in college, to shut up and listen.

Cheers!


Comment by
Chris Elam
March 30th, 2005
at 1:32 am

Tim, part of learning to shut up and listen is learning to grin and bear it when I step in it. =)

Here’s a shorter observation I meant to make earlier today before I started tiling the kitchen floor.

Homeschoolers are very fond of old adages, and taking a hard look at the way things used to be before the government screwed up the educational system beyond repair.

But one tidbit of wisdom that has fallen by the wayside goes thus – “Children should be seen, and not heard.” I don’t know many homeschoolers who still practice that one… =)


Comment by
Alex Haas
March 31st, 2005
at 7:59 am

Since none of the authors of this blog have personally experienced the emotions and thought processes of a young, k-12 homeschooled child…

I probably come the closest, even though I’m not an author of this blog and have not been home educated all the way to 12th grade yet. I have been home educated my entire life up until now, though.

Homeschool kids have been encouraged their whole lives to talk more and more… a trait that will not suit them well in the real world, in college, or at their first job. Its a trait that takes a long time and a lot of painful embarrassment to overcome.

I’ve been participating in activities with public-schooled children since I was about four. Neither I nor my friends have ever experienced this problem. It didn’t really take long to pick up on our surroundings and adapt.

Homeschool kids are notoriously unsympathetic to real world problems of peers when they first enter the real world.

Only when it comes to problems home-educated kids have no way of sympathising with. We have never known what it is like to have our favorite teacher give us too much homework or our best friend not sit next to us in the lunchroom.
[sarcastic melodrama]
*sigh* We’re so deprived. We should all be sent to school so we can experience the important character building that school offers.
[/sarcastic melodrama]
Home-educated children are not some separate species. We suffer most of the same “real world” problems that public-schoolers do.

Its ridiculous how cliquish homeschoolers become even after graduating high school.

Um, and public-schooled kids don’t? Yes, there are some home-educated kids like that, but I assure you, there are plenty more who are public-schooled.

That’s just another fact of life, but in a homeschool setting, these children are rarely, if ever, forced to work on overcoming their deficiencies, and are often set on the path of least resistance.

And what good would forcing them to be social do? Wouldn’t that make them even more socially clumsy and unwilling to socialise because they had been forced to by their parents? Children need to work this sort of thing out for themselves and not have their parents strong-arm them into it.


Comment by
Daryl
March 31st, 2005
at 9:24 am

I’m not an author of this blog

I just fixed that oversight. Alex, if you want, you’re invited. Your Dad can show you the login script. User name is Alex Haas. Email me for the password if you’re interested.