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  • LOCAL ITEM

    Filed at 7:27 am under by dcobranchi

    HE&OS is not going to become a NC-centric blog, so I’ve hesitated to post too much on the current proposal to regulate home education. But it seems that every paper in the South has picked up the story. Sometime commenter Hal Young is quoted at the end of this version.

    UPDATE: As bad as that was, here are a couple of worse comments. From a local editorial:

    The law requires home-schooled students to be tested, but reporting is effectively voluntary unless there is a complaint. Resulting variations in the quality of education that children receive are well known among college admissions officers. Given the academic demands on this generation, more vigilance would be wise, and Easley’s proposed reorganization would at least make it possible.

    And, in response, from one of the local listservs:

    I think the next to the last paragraph holds the key to the problem as they see it. Here’s an easy fix…put more money into the budget for those home visits and other oversight, precautionary and regulatory efforts already in place within the guidelines we follow with the DNPE. After all, wouldn’t we fall within the No Child Left Behind category as well? There is money from that, right? I know the ps aren’t getting theirs, but if we were that worried about them, our children would still be attending their schools.

    8 Responses to “LOCAL ITEM”


    Comment by
    JAMM
    March 29th, 2005
    at 8:35 am

    Some committee members expressed interest in increasing oversight of homeschoolers.

    We must all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.” ~ Ben Franklin

    So I do not see this as only a local issue but rather a camels noses into the tent.


    Comment by
    Tim Haas
    March 29th, 2005
    at 9:23 am

    “Home-schoolers aren’t opposed to adequate and proper oversight,” said Steve Hand, a home-school parent in Apex. “But in other states, there have been efforts to reduce parents’ choices over their children’s education.”

    Unless “adequate and proper” means none, we certainly are opposed.


    Comment by
    Natalie
    March 29th, 2005
    at 9:39 am

    Since this looks like an administrative move over which the Governor has sole power rather than a legislative issue, what can NC homeschoolers do to block or reverse it? Surely they are not powerless…


    Comment by
    Daryl
    March 29th, 2005
    at 9:43 am

    The legislature would have to approve of the change. There’s the leverage.


    Comment by
    JAMM
    March 29th, 2005
    at 9:57 am

    I am in NC and while looking through the local community college catalog, I chuckled at the very large number of remedial courses offered. Suddenly it does not seem so funny to me. Perhap the DPI should assure that their students are actually graduating with a quality of education that does not need remediation before trying to oversee hsers.


    Comment by
    Ian Lewis
    March 29th, 2005
    at 10:28 am

    All the NC government needs to do is show the people that the politicians can provide “proper and adequate oversight” to the children of NC and the parents can not. This should not be hard. jk.


    Comment by
    Eric Holcombe
    March 29th, 2005
    at 10:57 am

    “baggage” – how quaint. I guess the fact that the state totally controlled those schools for 15 years with no funding should be conveniently forgotten.

    I also like the logical disconnect here: “the Division of Nonpublic Education came to be in the Department of Administration with agencies as unrelated as the Capitol Police and the State Energy Office” …however, funding the public schools will be based entirely on the value of your house – totally unrelated to whether you use the system or not.


    Comment by
    Ginger
    March 29th, 2005
    at 11:10 am

    Public schools are full of ‘adequate and proper oversight’, and they still can’t do the job!

    Public schools and homeschools are largely incompatible to begin with. Public schools strive for and encourage conformity and mediocrity, while most homeschools strive to produce adults who think for themselves and are successful (whether that definition of success is financial, or happiness, etc).

    It’d be like hitching two horses together who have very different ideas of which direction to go. Neither horse reaches its destination!