Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » LETTER OF THE DAY
  • LETTER OF THE DAY

    Filed at 8:30 pm under by dcobranchi

    This isn’t really a home education letter, but it raises an interesting point:

    Let’s ask the parents

    Re: “Rotten Education � Students can’t prepare for the world today in the schools of yesterday,” by Bill Gates, April 24 Points.

    I have been a teacher since 1965 and was an A student in New York in the ’40s. I earned a master’s in education in 1972, while raising four children. I am still teaching visually impaired students in Rockwall. I love what I do, and I love children.

    I’m also the first to agree that the present education system is not preparing our next generation for the future. The only way that school has changed since the ’40s is the addition of technology.

    Two questions that can be answered in one simple sentence: (1) Why is home-schooling becoming more effective than public school? (2) Why do Indian and Asian children excel in public school?

    Their parents are involved and see education as of prime importance and worth spending the time and effort to facilitate.

    Parental education and more emphasis on preschool programs might be a start to help parents’ priorities and values.

    Betty Donovan, Richardson

    I’ve probably been guilty of this more than most, but I’m really starting to question the wisdom of even comparing home education to g-schooling (Tim and Chris are likely singing a hallelujah breakdown chorus ’bout now). Right now we think we can show that HEKs outperform g-schoolers in any number of measures. We’ve used these stats to justify home education. But what if they’re bogus? Or if the g-schools improve so much that their kids routinely outperform ours? Do we really want to build our justification for home education on such a flimsy foundation? Better by far, I think, to just point out that our kids are happy, they’re not being obviously deprived of an education (or anything else), and that raising our kids as we see fit is our fundamental right.

    6 Responses to “LETTER OF THE DAY”


    Comment by
    Andrea
    April 30th, 2005
    at 9:17 pm

    “more emphasis on preschool programs might be a start to” actually hinder parent’s relationships with their children. Why are more parents not involved in their chidren’s education? Because “it’s the school’s job”. Parents are constantly told that the experts know more about your kids that you do.

    I think there is no comparison of home-ed to g-schools. Apples-oranges.


    Comment by
    Chris
    April 30th, 2005
    at 9:26 pm

    “Tim and Chris are likely singing a hallelujah breakdown chorus ’bout now”

    I don’t know about that, but we might have to cancel the “education” sessions we were planing for you at the campground 🙂

    As I’ve said many times, even if my kids were just doing average, we’d still homeschool. It’s not about CAT9 test scores.

    The revelation via Gatto that the whole point of forced schooling was to break up the family unit and make men more “manageable” really brings some of this into focus.


    Comment by
    Tim Haas
    April 30th, 2005
    at 10:17 pm

    Aw, hell — if there’s no need for sessions, we’re going to be forced to swim and play frisbee and stuff.


    Comment by
    Anonymous
    April 30th, 2005
    at 10:40 pm

    I have read that achievement tests are being aligned to the “federal curriculum” and homeschoolers not learning it won’t do as well. At the following link, towards the bottom of the page, it gives examples about the Iowa Test. magic-....shtml

    I think you are on the right track, Daryl. Since homeschoolers have nationally been outscoring public school students, it only makes sense that there would be some way that govt. schooling would turn it around on us. Makes me think of the SAT. Public school students aren’t scoring well: adjust the test to make it easier to get a higher score. Teachers look better and the methods stay intact.

    The Illinois article you linked (the mother being charged with truancy for improper homeschooling), made me wonder how unschoolers would do against the mentality of pull out your books and papers to prove “proper” homeschooling is happening. I don’t think we should allow govt. schooling to define what homeschooling is. I don’t want the litmus test of homeschooling to be achievement test scores either. I think it is about foundation. Govt. schools have defined what education is–it is a block of information if successfully imparted to the students’ brains over 12 years. If I have traits similar to Thomas Edison in my child, I would be silly to push the curriculum rather than have time for his experimentations and explorations in learning. I think education is supposed to be highly individualized and specialized. The foundation of govt. schooling rests on cookie-cutter learning. Comparing apples and oranges. Or is it like Rocks to Pears? 🙂
    homeed...e.html

    ~Annette


    Comment by
    Carlotta
    May 1st, 2005
    at 7:26 am

    >Do we really want to build our justification for home education on such a flimsy foundation? (ie: academic comparisons). Better by far, I think, to just point out that our kids are happy, they’re not being obviously deprived of an education (or anything else), and that raising our kids as we see fit is our fundamental right.>

    Yep, plus in allowing our kids to follow their interests, they will be learning in the optimal way to suit their age, ability and aptitude…(British legal requirement.) They won’t be forced to attend to theories that are not active in their minds, which of course is something that happens with deadening frequency in school where pupils are forced to answer questions they never asked in the first place.


    Comment by
    Gene
    May 3rd, 2005
    at 12:27 am

    Or if the g-schools improve so much that their kids routinely outperform ours?
    ****
    This gives me visions of Hell….and freezing temperatures….
    I don’t think it is going to happen.