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  • TANSTAAFL

    Filed at 6:06 am under by dcobranchi

    Except apparently in PA.

    Jesse sometimes gets to the breakfasts that are also part of the new free summer food program of the Line Mountain School District. He usually rides his bike or walks to his school.

    …A federal grant is providing funding for the program with the district reimbursed $1.56 for every breakfast and $2.74 for every lunch served.

    … The program is also open to district residents who attend parochial and cyber schools and who are homeschooled.

    Tipster Mike wonders if this isn’t some nefarious scheme to trap HEKs. I think it’s just the educrats once again expanding their reach into what should be a parental obligation.

    Re-posted from HEM.

    2 Responses to “TANSTAAFL”


    Comment by
    Concierge
    July 15th, 2005
    at 10:21 pm

    Yes, I’ll put my money on your bet that it is a nefarious scheme.

    If not the same, there is a similar program available to child care operators – in home and in large facilities. The paperwork is a nightmare to complete, and for child care – it invites the health department AND members of the local federal grant offering office for periodic, madatory compliance checks. To apply you need to send in a ton of private information for their statistics. Ugh.


    Comment by
    NMcV
    July 16th, 2005
    at 10:44 pm

    Back when I was a “welfare mom”, I took my two kids to a summer program run by the school districts. My daughter had fun — arts & crafts, swimming, games, the kind of things that she’d get at the summer camp that I couldn’t afford to send her to. My son went for breakfast, and then returned home with me. He was just old enough to participate, but they had no personnel qualified to work with a young autistic kid.

    I was and remain grateful that the summer program was available, and theat they fed my son. At the time, that alone was difficult for me.

    I can imagine the cries if such programs — all tax-funded — had been available only for kids enrolled in public school, where the programs happened to be located.