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  • EVANGELICAL HOMESCHOOLING

    Filed at 5:59 am under by dcobranchi

    The folks at Exodus Mandate want religious home educating families to preach the good news of home ed. Seriously.

    Every year many of us find ourselves answering questions from friends and relatives about home schooling. Frequently we also know the people asking questions are intrigued about home schooling, but they are timid to begin the adventure we have found so rewarding. No bridge has existed to help these families transition from early childhood or from public school into home schooling.

    Homeschooling Family to Family can become that bridge. Homeschooling Family to Family asks us to extend the hand of Christian fellowship as a home-schooling mentor to help a new family set aside personal fears and begin to home school. We want to encourage seasoned home schoolers to mentor at least one family per year by reaching out to relatives and friends and by helping them take the first step into home schooling! As experienced home schoolers, we can transform those inevitable kitchen-table and backyard conversations into positive home schooling outreach. And, in some cases, mentoring a new family into home schooling will become an opportunity to share the Gospel of Christ.

    Although I’m a relative newbie to homeschooling, I think I’ve earned my bona fides blogging over the last 3 1/2 years. I’m sold on the lifestyle, through and through. Still, I’m not sure this is a good idea. If someone asks how to get started, of course we all are willing to share. But reaching out and attempting to talk someone into it? Uh-uh.

    I can just picture one of us standing on a street corner with a copy of Holt, preaching to the unconverted g-schoolers.

    UPDATE: Izzy comes down mostly in favor on this. What do y’all think?

    9 Responses to “EVANGELICAL HOMESCHOOLING”


    Comment by
    MH
    October 7th, 2005
    at 9:15 am

    It is already hard enough for those of us who are secular to hs and now they want to further control the hs movement with increased numbers of “their” kind. I fear for our ablility to hs the way we choose. This could change the face of hsing to something that is hostile to those of us who are non traditional homeschoolers. In NC, we already have to declare if we are a religious or a non religious school.

    I agree, I would help anyone hs in any manner that their family desires if asked. But to recruit may bring in the unwilling who want to change hsing into something they are comfortable with which is the public school model or school at home.


    Comment by
    speedwell
    October 7th, 2005
    at 9:24 am

    Yes, I absolutely sniff a whiff of “baptizing and renaming the natives” here. I distinctly remember the feeling of dividing the world into Christians and potential Christians. I get the definite impression they don’t want to associate with fellow unschoolers who are uncompromising atheists.


    Comment by
    Scott W. Somerville
    October 7th, 2005
    at 10:29 am

    Let me make the opposite case for a moment… suppose the Supreme Court had never banned school prayer and the Public Schools of Jesusland were using all their tax-funded powers to indoctrinate little K-12ers into theocratic values. Some progressives would think it a public duty to help other parents see what kind of Kool-Aid the g-schools were giving their children.

    I was born in Alabama in 1958, back when the white political establishment was still engaged in its campaign of “massive resistance” to desegregation. It’s easy for me to imagine what America would be like if the Civil Rights movement had failed. Would it be right to organize an “exodus” to get parents to pull their children out of racially segregated g-schools?

    I recognize that there are some principled homeschoolers who believe it is wrong to impose their values on any other person. I respect that. Those nonjudgmental parents aren’t likely to criticize the Exodus Mandate folks, of course, because that would be imposing the value of nonjudgmentalism on other people.

    So I’m left with people who think it is right to impose SOME values on SOME people, but worry about the Exodus folks when they try to impose THEIR values on their fellow Christians.

    I’m trying to come up with some way that this isn’t just a case of “I don’t like THOSE values so I’m going to criticize them.” Could somebody help me see it?


    Comment by
    Daryl
    October 7th, 2005
    at 10:41 am

    Those nonjudgmental parents aren’t likely to criticize the Exodus Mandate folks, of course, because that would be imposing the value of nonjudgmentalism on other people.

    Call me judgmental, then.

    Homeschooling isn’t right for everyone. I’m one of those libertarian wackos that just wants to be left alone to raise my children as I see fit. Assuming that there are other folks of the same mindset (even in the g-schools), I’d just as soon we not preach to the unconverted.

    I know if the shoe were on the other foot, I’d be resentful as hell.

    So, if someone asks, I’ll politely answer. If someone criticizes, I have 3.5 years of g-school horror stories to blast away with.


    Comment by
    Lioness
    October 7th, 2005
    at 11:22 am

    Isn’t this what Dan was talking about? It’s a vicious headgame Christians are playing with other Christians. Personally I don’t want to get close enouth to it to get tarred.


    Comment by
    MH
    October 7th, 2005
    at 5:19 pm

    Scott,

    How about this? Freedom of speech does not allow you to yell fire in a crowded movie theater. So they are free to hs as they like until they start to trample on my freedom to hs. I have enough experience of religious hser to have a basis of my fears. I have meet many “you should do it like this” hsers or “you should not hs unless you have a calling from God” hsers.

    “impose THEIR values on their fellow Christians.”

    Well, not all homeschoolers are christians, are they? North Carolina Home Educators already justify the fundemental christian tone of their organization by saying most hsers are christian. They have a strangle hold on communications with the state. Other christians and non christians are left out in the cold in representation to the state. It has left a divided hsing community that may come back to bite us in the end.

    I also agree with Daryl that hsing should not be something one is pressured into since it encompasses a lifestyle change.


    Comment by
    Lioness
    October 8th, 2005
    at 1:11 am

    Y’know, according to the surveys so far the great thing about hsing is that almost all hsers genuinely like their children. If you get people trying to make that enourmous commitment of money, time and energy who don’t really like their children, but who feel obligated to because it’s expected of them, their resentment is going to cause things to turn very ugly indeed.

    I was brought up in one of those households. If my parents had been presented with bad schools and pressured to homeschool me by their church, I probably would have killed myself by one means or another.


    Comment by
    Lioness
    October 8th, 2005
    at 1:14 am

    By “one of those households” I meant “dysfunctional, felt obligated not to divorce by their church, turned their resentment into child abuse”. Of such parents good homeschooling households are NOT made.


    Comment by
    judy aron
    October 8th, 2005
    at 11:22 pm

    I say that if anyone wants information about homeschooling I will be happy in a heartbeat to help them out – but I am not about to push homeschooling on anyone, nor would I be presumptuous enough to tell them that they should do it a specific way. Homeschooling is a very personal issue, everyone must choose their own way to accomplish their goals of educating their children. That is why I am so passionate about homeschool freedom. It is not something that can or must be done a specific way – nor should government or anyone else dictate how anyone should homeschool.
    The only thing people should know is that homeschooling is an option.. the rest they should be able to find out on their own by reading, talking to others, or otherwise seeking other relevant information.