Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » I’M NOT ANTI-ROB REICH

I’M NOT ANTI-ROB REICH

Filed at 4:36 am under by dcobranchi

in the sense that I want to see him banned. I want good regulations to apply to him who chooses to spew nonsense about homeschooling.

9 Responses to “I’M NOT ANTI-ROB REICH”


Comment by
Annette
January 15th, 2007
at 7:48 am

I love it! That made my day. Of course, I had to find the article to know what you are talking about.


Comment by
Jeanne
January 15th, 2007
at 8:14 am

Yah, and if he doesn’t do anything that should cause him to fear regulation, then that little bit of regulation won’t hurt him at all. In fact, I think he should invite regulation of himself, just to prove that he has nothing to hide. What’s the big deal?

Furthermore, since he’s now a homeschooling expert, I was wondering if he will be moonlighting by homeschooling other people’s children. Oh, you mean he’s an expert but he doesn’t actually have any experience homeschooling? Is this sort of like being an expert fisherman by watching some people fish, reading about how some people fish, and drawing conclusions about all fishing and fishermen? Golly, that just seems so non-primary research to me. Plus, since he seems so worried about bias in studies of homeschoolers — without recognizing/understanding that many homeschoolers do NOT promote use of much of the same data to support homeschooling, seems like he’d worry about how his comments apply, if they do at all, to a very tiny sample of the homeschooling population, surely misrepresenting the whole.

Finally, (mostly removing tongue from cheek) I wish I could invite Mr. Reich to accompany some of the homeschooled kids and teens I know on their daily lives, for a glimpse into a world of homeschooling that he is apparently not even aware of. (I laugh every time I hear that people think having read The Kingdom of Children has given them understanding into the “two types” of homeschoolers.) I think the last thing he’d find is “servile.”

We could WISH for a little more servile around here. (sarcasm)


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
January 15th, 2007
at 12:28 pm

Jeanne,

There are two types of legitimate experts. There are those who have vast experience in a field. Like an expert mechanic, they’ve got dirt under their fingernails.

The other type of expert is one who has studied all of the literature and previous work in a field, and expands the knowledge of the world by generating new studies and data.

Reich doesn’t qualify under either definition.


Comment by
Anonymous
January 15th, 2007
at 3:06 pm

Well, on NHEN-legislative the first time around with Dr. Reich, he had a new baby as I recall. So he’s had time to get dirty as real-life Dad, and I’m thinking by now his little guy ought to be well into the elementary school years. Wonder what’s he’s been experiencing as he see the everyday effects in his own homelife of that? And how he analyzes and explains the ethics of it all to himself and his son?


Comment by
JJ Ross
January 15th, 2007
at 3:09 pm

Sorry all, that last comment was mine but it seems my virtual cookies were snatched or something when I wasn’t paying attention? . . .


Comment by
Anonymous
January 16th, 2007
at 1:55 am

Daryl said, “I want good regulations to apply to him who chooses to spew nonsense about homeschooling.”

Well, I don’t know about “good.”

But in any case, look at it this way: If the dominionists ever do gain a political majority and become The State, the one bright spot will be watching Rob Reich, Michael Apple, et al, back-peddle mightily on virtually every utterance they ever emitted, as their children are led off for their mandatory IVBE (“Ideas, Values, and Beliefs Exposure,” or, in its political — that is to say, verbose — form, “Exposure To and Engagement With Ideas, Values, and Beliefs Different From Those of The Parents”).

That rather engaging prospect almost — not quite, but almost — makes one positively long for a dominionist take-over.


Comment by
freerangelife
January 16th, 2007
at 2:14 am

That last bit of blather was me.

Guess I was so entertained by the image of Rob, come summer, dutifully shoveling his children onto the Ku Klux Klan Kamp bus that I neglected to fill in all the blanks.

(But then, he does that anyway, right? I mean, he ensures the exposure of his children to ideas, values, and beliefs that are diametrically opposed to his own, in deliberate and thoughtful avoidance of the “ethical servility” trap? Right? Surely he doesn’t hand-pick his children’s exposures to reflect only those “different” ideas, values, and beliefs that he can stomach? …. Does he???)


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
January 16th, 2007
at 4:13 am

Interestingly, I posed this same scenario to Reich in an email exchange earlier this evening:

Gedankenexperiment– The Dominionists take control of the government and impose a theocracy. All kids are forced to attend fundamentalist Christian indoctrination in the schools. A few hardcore libertarian parents fight for the right to teach their kids about freedom and the Separation of Church and State. Do you still worry about servility then?


Comment by
Jeanne
January 16th, 2007
at 4:09 pm

“All kids are forced to attend fundamentalist Christian indoctrination in the schools. A few hardcore libertarian parents fight for the right to teach their kids about freedom and the Separation of Church and State. ”

I do indeed feel the Reichs of the world need to have some extended visits to Mississippi, North Carolina, and Virginia, where we’ve lived. Your scenario bears a great resemblance to reality in many Bible-belt communities. We (my family and my fellow homeschoolers) are the ones living in such a way that will encourage our children to question authority. Homeschooling in the midst of these communities allows us to teach things like “religions of the world” and allows, for instance, our acceptance of the theory of evolution to pervade all our studies.

Maybe his life is a bit, uh, culturally isolated. He should expose himself to some parts of his country where his beliefs are not in the mainstream. He could ask any presidential hopeful of the importance of this.

Or he could just ask my kids.