Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » BEGGING THE QUESTIONS
  • BEGGING THE QUESTIONS

    Filed at 2:12 am under by dcobranchi

    I have come to the conclusion that the theory of evolution does not apply in the political world. The stupidest, least-fit folks not only survive, they get elected to the TN State Senate:

    A Tennessee State Senate member has filed a resolution asking the Tennessee Department of Education to address a few basic questions about life, the universe and all that:

    * “Is the universe and all that is within it, including human beings, created through purposeful, intelligent design by a Supreme Being, that is a Creator?”
    * “Since the universe, including human beings, is created by a supreme being (a creator), why is creationism not taught in Tennessee public schools?
    * “Since it cannot be determined whether the universe, including human beings, is created by a supreme being (a creator), why is creationism not taught as an alternative concept, explanation, or theory, along with the theory of evolution in Tennessee public schools?”

    State Sen. Raymond Finney (R-Maryville), a retired physician, is asking the Senate to endorse his questions to the Department of Education, and for the department to come back with a response by January 15, 2008.

    I’ve heard that holding two diametrically opposed ideas at one time can lead to insanity. I believe we have seen the proof here. (via Jesus’ General)

    UPDATE: P.Z. Myers has more.

    5 Responses to “BEGGING THE QUESTIONS”


    Comment by
    sam
    March 3rd, 2007
    at 3:04 am

    That’s not so far away from where I live. Politics is funny around these parts though. You should see the fiasco that is my county’s end run around term limits.


    Comment by
    COD
    March 3rd, 2007
    at 9:14 am

    Given how well adapted politicians have become at self preservation, one might argue that politics is the ultimate proof of evolution.


    Comment by
    David
    March 3rd, 2007
    at 4:59 pm

    The questions not withstanding, I firmly believe that creationism should be taught as one alternative theory to evolution. I know this position may cause an uproar but I just don’t see how allowing kids the opportunity to see that different theories exist can be harmful.

    It just seems that some topics get relegated to the 3rd rail of politics without even the slighest bit of debait and it is a shame that politicians have to actually introduce topics like this into bills for debate.

    David


    Comment by
    Daryl
    March 3rd, 2007
    at 5:17 pm

    Whose creation myth? Christian? Hindu? Native American? Why not Pastafarian?

    There are at least two reasons that creationism should NOT be taught in g-schools:

    1) It’s not a scientific theory that is an alternative to evolutionary theory. Creationism isn’t even science.

    2) Teaching any religion’s creation myth a “Truth” violates the Establishment Clause of the Constitution.

    Other than those minor issues– Great idea!


    Comment by
    Nance Confer
    March 4th, 2007
    at 12:29 pm

    It just seems that some topics get relegated to the 3rd rail of politics without even the slighest bit of debait. . .
    ****
    Without the slightest bit of debate??? What country have you been living in?

    Debate it all you want. Tell your kids all you want about your beliefs.

    But don’t tell my kids that your beliefs are science. And don’t expect me to pay you to do it.

    If we had the luxury of things like comparative religion courses, these things might be covered correctly in public school. But, as things, are, we don’t.

    Nance