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AN OPEN LETTER TO THE EDITORIAL BOARD OF THE FAYETTEVILLE OBSERVER

Filed at 10:43 am under by dcobranchi

I mailed the following to two of the editors at the paper:

Can we bring them home now?

I was traveling overseas this past week. While heading out to Germany, a family consisting of a mom and three young girls were saying goodbye to their soldier husband and father. The mom was brave until after her husband had gone down the jetway, when she and her daughters all burst into tears. I cried too.

The Observer ought to take a stand and call for withdrawal. Every day three or four families are destroyed. Sometimes right here in town. And for what? So Bush doesn’t lose face? The mission was accomplished 4 years ago. The only thing the occupation is accomplishing now is getting a lot of men and women killed– men like that young father I saw at the airport.

Does the F-O editorial board have no heart? Or are you all just scared of being accused of not supporting the troops.

SUPPORT THE TROOPS BY BRINGING THEM HOME.

Daryl Cobranchi

8 Responses to “AN OPEN LETTER TO THE EDITORIAL BOARD OF THE FAYETTEVILLE OBSERVER”


Comment by
Klasher5
July 22nd, 2007
at 1:10 pm

A different point, regardless of what suffering American families are enduring, American soldiers are wrongly perpetrating suffering upon many thousands of Iraqi families. And getting the troops out immediately is the best way to stop it.


Comment by
Rob
July 23rd, 2007
at 12:49 pm

A different perspective, from someone on the ground in Iraq:
michae...07.htm

“The big news on the streets today is that the people of Baqubah are generally ecstatic, although many hold in reserve a serious concern that we will abandon them again.”


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
July 23rd, 2007
at 1:19 pm

He’s a right-wing blogger who is entirely dependent on right-wing blog readers for his support (i.e., money). I wouldn’t take anything he says as gospel.


Comment by
Rob
July 23rd, 2007
at 4:18 pm

Yon is right-wing? How do you figure?

I mean, certainly we right-wingers love him, because his current reporting from the ground tells us what we’re wanting to hear (like Iraqis are glad we’re there, the surge is making a difference, our troops are good guys and professionals, Al Qaeda is bad and needs to be killed, etc). But he was also at the vanguard of shouting the phrase “Iraq civil war”. He’s also covered stuff when it wasn’t going how we neocons want it to go.

How do you figure he’s right wing?


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
July 23rd, 2007
at 7:52 pm

He tells right wingers what they they’re “wanting to hear.” What do you think that makes him?


Comment by
sam
July 24th, 2007
at 9:15 am

“wanting to hear”? Wow, what a powerful phrase. I’d much prefer the truth.


Comment by
Rob
July 24th, 2007
at 12:42 pm

Well, I’m a big fan of “follow the money” myself, but I’m not sure it automatically makes people one-sided agenda-pushing liars. And nobody I know is worthy of having their opinion on Iraq be considered gospel.
Yon has said many things I “didn’t want to hear”. He’s described how we’re losing the war when he’s seen it, he was an early voice identifying civil war in Iraq, and he’s been about the only voice I’ve heard covering the world-record bumper crop of poppies in Afghanistan. He’s covered Afghanistan opium trade early and often. Hardly the actions of someone wanting to make Dubbya look good, or pander to his readers so they’ll buy his next fancy camera.


Comment by
Wojo
July 24th, 2007
at 1:47 pm

Daryl,
> Not withstanding the validity of the decision to enter Iraq, we did stick our arm into that tar-barrel, and getting it out won’t be easy! I don’t think any rational person wants to “stay”, but there is, and should be debate on the best way to do that.
> I have seen off many of the 82nd folks I know from Green Ramp at Pope AFB, and have seen many come home. Next returnee will be in November, and I would welcome you coming along as my guest.
> As a Vietnam Vet and a retired Army guy, I know first hand the emotions of departure. It’s a fact of life for the military… that’s one thing we totally understood when we volunteered.
> One thing I do hope when we ultimately “bail”, is that we do a better exit than we did from VN… if some think that Americans are “perpetrating suffering” on the Iraqis, imagine the aftermath of a precipitate withdrawal?
>All that said, I do agree we need an exit strategy from this complex mess… one that doesn’t leave a bigger mess in its wake. Regards…