Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » MY MAN BARRY

MY MAN BARRY

Filed at 8:41 pm under by dcobranchi

Barack Obama polled a 21 point lead in NC this week.

I’m voting for the Democrat in the GE. I’ll be pulling the (electronic) lever for Obama on May 6th.

16 Responses to “MY MAN BARRY”


Comment by
speedwell
March 25th, 2008
at 11:42 pm

Ugh. I fell for the Messiah/Savior story once already, and got over it. Maybe I’m vaccinated against Obama this year.

Tell me the truth… are you voting FOR Obama, or AGAINST the rest of them?

Honestly, when are people going to realize that unthinking faith in the State is a religion just like any other? You give your hearts and minds to some high priest figure claiming to bring the new Paradise. You tithe doubly from your paycheck. You believe whatever you’re told by the people who write the laws. And if you’re a churchgoer, you are engaging in idolatry.


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
March 26th, 2008
at 4:03 am

Either Obama or Hillary would, I believe, make fine presidents. McCain, OTOH. would be worse than Bush. Seriously– a violent possibly senile old man with his finger on the nuclear button.

So, am I voting FOR the Democrat or against McCain? Both!


Comment by
Toni
March 26th, 2008
at 7:32 am

I can think of another reason why I’ll vote for Obama over “Hil in the primaries:
cbsnew....shtml


Comment by
Divers and Sundry
March 26th, 2008
at 7:59 am

“Honestly, when are people going to realize that unthinking faith in the State is a religion just like any other?”

I voted for Obama in our primary, not because of some unthinking faith in the state but because I honestly think that he’s the best option of the Democrats left standing. And either of them is less likely than McCain to go invade some other country.

I do agree much of what is claimed as patriotism in our churches is idolatry.


Comment by
don
March 26th, 2008
at 8:41 am

I’m as cynical about politicians as anyone else. In the 22 years that I’ve been of voting age, I can’t say that I’ve ever voted for someone that I really felt was the right person for a particular office. Usually it’s just the “lesser of two evils” approach.

That said, I am more excited about Obama than I have been about any candidate, ever. I don’t think he’s a messiah that is worthy of following blindly (I don’t think anyone is worthy of that). But he is certainly intelligent, motivated, and seemingly more honest than any other politician I can think of. I have a lot of respect for the way he handled the Jeremiah Wright issue. The politically easy way would have been to disown him. But rather than throwing him under the bus, Obama gave an honest, thoughtful response that reflects the fact that many issues are more complex than simple, black or white matters.

Having a president that can deal with complex issues in a honest and forthright manner? Yeah, I can support that.


Comment by
Dawn
March 26th, 2008
at 10:26 am

If I had a vote I’m pretty sure I’d be voting for Obama. It was his speech on race that swung me. He took what the media was portraying as a simple issue and really examined it giving people a chance to see the contributing factors and complexities of the issue.

He’s a thinker. When is the last time the US had one of those for a president?


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
March 26th, 2008
at 10:34 am

2622 days. Was this a trick question?


Comment by
COD
March 26th, 2008
at 12:32 pm

2622 – I assume that refers to Clinton? I think Dawn was referring to thinking with the other head 🙂


Comment by
Rob
March 26th, 2008
at 1:55 pm

I can’t pick. McCain recently botched a talk in the Middle East, messing up which sect of Islam was mad at who. A president needs to know this crap.
Hillary campaigns to the left and votes to the center – she’d probably raise taxes and keep us in the war. That’s doable.
Obama is a wildcard with no experience and socialism in his blood.
I didn’t think it was possible to be this apathetic about the choices placed in front of me. Maybe someone will announce a running mate I give a wet slap about, or talk about cabinet positions.


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
March 26th, 2008
at 2:05 pm

Right. No experience. 11 years in the Illinois Senate, 2 in the US. Harvard Law degree. Community activist for many years. Yeah, so much better to trust the gov’t to a guy who had managed to run an oil company or two into the ground. I always vote for the smarter candidate. It’s never steered me wrong.

And socialism? Give me a break. Name one industry that Obama has proposed nationalizing.


Comment by
speedwell
March 26th, 2008
at 6:29 pm

I hear the writer Mary Ruwart is throwing her bonnet in the ring for the Libertarian Party Presidential candidacy. She’s got personality, good ideas, professionalism. I’m not a party member or particularly interested in voting Libertarian, and at this stage of the game the Libs are more about making freedom noises than anything (and I can help make noise, you bet), but the other candidates of all parties can learn a lot from her about how to think about the sorts of things this country is supposed to be proud of.

Plus, imagine the hoot it would be if Ron Paul lost the Republican nomination, jumped the fence, and ram as her running mate. Ru/Paul for President! hahahahaha….


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
March 26th, 2008
at 6:51 pm

So which one gets to wear the tiara and feather boa?


Comment by
don
March 26th, 2008
at 10:28 pm

This bit about Obama not having any experience is bullshit. Obama has more experience in elected office than Clinton does. Eleven years between the Illinois house and the US Senate. Clinton has seven years in the US Senate. Being the wife of the President doesn’t count IMO. She was in charge of one major policy initiative during that time (health care reform) and it failed miserably.

And McCain has more political experience than either of them, but it’d be a cold day in Ecuador before I’d vote for him.


Comment by
Nicole
March 26th, 2008
at 10:39 pm

I’ve been able to vote in 2 Presidential elections and have gone Republican in both.
I’m very fiscally conservative, but I sometimes feel that Sen. Obama would be the best choice for the entire country, even if he isn’t my ideal candidate.
At least he wants an exit strategy out of Irag and isn’t gunning for Iran.


Comment by
sam
March 27th, 2008
at 12:07 pm

Gravel or Kucinich would have been much better candidates than either Clinton or Obama. I don’t think either C or O are the least bit qualified to be president, but so many people have allowed the media to marginalize the really good candidates to the point where I feel most voters never really realized they actually had good options. The talking heads have been preaching Clinton and Obama from day one, so people don’t bother looking any deeper. Neither of them are going to do that much to make our nation the place it should be, and they’re both going to suck as president in their own special way.

Obama is basically a secular preacher with very little going for him as far as I can tell. His supporters are every bit as spiteful and shitty as they claim Clinton and her supporters are. He is charismatic, and some tiny part of me hopes that he will be able to bring us together, give us the unity he preaches. I’d love to be able to get behind the pretty words, but I also know that his hope isn’t feeding me or my family.

Clinton does, on some level, seem to represent more of the same old shit we should have thrown out years ago, but I do believe she has more experience in general. Suggesting that she was nothing but Bill’s wife is really demeaning to all she did before he became president as well as what she attempted as first lady.

In the end, neither of them were the best candidate, but like we blind and stupid Americans are want to do, we chose young and pretty. We avoided the old guys because old and white are the curse of our brave new world. We ignored the odd looking guy with the hot wife for stupid reasons such as his suggestion that he may have seen a UFO. We claim to want honesty, yet we continue to vote our value in empty rhetoric.

So, one more election where I’m voting against someone rather than for someone. One more election where the people who speak to me are never once allowed to have their moment. I’ll pull the lever for Dem, but I’ll be holding my nose and choking back tears . . . again. Thanks.


Comment by
Daryl Cobranchi
March 27th, 2008
at 12:28 pm

Kucinich is far to the left of the American mainstream. He would have been unelectable in the GE. And as for Gravel, you can always vote Libertarian.