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  • THE LAW IS A ASS

    Filed at 9:55 am under by dcobranchi

    Chicago schools are facing a “logistical nightmare” (read “impossible task”). As many as 250,000 kids from over 350 failing schools will have the option of transferring out. The catch, only 5,000 slots are available in the receiving schools. Here’s the crazy part, though:

    This year, for 2003 tests, only reading and math scores were considered, but the poor performance of just one “subgroup”–such as low-income kids, special education students, African American kids or Hispanic students–was added to the mix.

    For previously low-scoring schools, that meant that if 60 percent of students schoolwide or 60 percent of students in any subgroup did not hit grade level on state math or reading tests, then all students would be eligible for choice. That 60 percent threshold was up from about 50 percent last year.

    What’s the point? If a particular school has a poor special ed program, let the kids in special ed transfer.

    Chicago schools on the tentative choice list included 11 honored as “schools of distinction” for progress on a battery of measures, including last year’s state tests. That included Shields Elementary, which was tripped up by the performance of about 200 special education and bilingual education students.

    …”I was a school of distinction,” said [Principal Rita] Gardner. “We’ve done nothing but raise our scores. But now I’m on a bad list. I have 2,000 kids. Where would they go? People are fighting to get their kids in here.”

    2 Responses to “THE LAW IS A ASS”


    Comment by
    Laura
    August 7th, 2003
    at 6:46 pm

    I am very disappointed in the NCLB act. Some of its provisions are really stupid.


    Comment by
    Diane
    August 8th, 2003
    at 12:57 am

    Stupid? Not at all. NCLB is accomplishing exactly what its creators want it to: eventually every school will be labeled as “failing,” everyone can run around screaming about the “failing” schools, and then voucher proponents can ram vouchers through the Congress.

    They’re just being sneaky and underhanded about it, is all.