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  • SUGAR IN HONDA’S TANK

    Filed at 6:53 am under by dcobranchi

    Chris O’Donnell has a very nice one page summary of the HONDA legislation (HR 2732) and why he’s opposed. Here’s my $0.02. IMHO, the most pernicious part of this bill is in the “Findings” section, particularly Section 2 (3)

    (3) Education by parents at home has proven to be an effective means for young people to achieve success on standardized tests and to learn valuable socialization skills.

    This just opens the door to an NEA charge of “Prove it!” Do we really want to take the chance that this bill would lead to mandatory testing of homeschoolers? One other thing- here’s another link to the text of the bill. The one Chris provides (to the official government website) has an incomplete version of the bill. Your tax dollars at work.

    6 Responses to “SUGAR IN HONDA’S TANK”


    Comment by
    Skip Oliva
    September 7th, 2003
    at 11:14 am

    Congressional findings don’t really work that way, Daryl. They’re principally a tool for proving legislative intent to courts, in which context they are considered conclusive statements of fact unless disproven. I doubt the statement you cite could be used by NEA or other anti-homeschooling groups to regulate homeschoolers. It doesn’t alter the status quo in that respect.


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    September 7th, 2003
    at 12:25 pm

    Understood but the NEA has many powerful friends in state legislatures. That’s where this legislation will play out. In Delaware, for example, there are more teacher/legislators than any other profession (including lawyers). We have no testing provision now. I don’t want to provide the DE legislature with any ammo to try to change that. Homeschool organizations across the country are wrestling with these same issues. Homeschooling traditionally has been a local (i.e., state) issue. We’re familiar with the players and we know the game. In fact, we’re pretty damn good at it. Escalating homeschooling to the federal domain is a game we are unwilling to play. We see little to no benefit and a lot of risks. HSLDA sees it differently. Unfortunately, they do not play well with others.


    Comment by
    Dave
    September 7th, 2003
    at 12:46 pm

    I am concerned about HONDA and appreciate your posts… However, your comments about HSLDA are confusing. You recently linked to an anti-HSLDA page that contained false information that cast HSLDA in a negative light. Then, someone from HSLDA posted a comment to your BLOG that explained the background of that information and why HSLDA responds as they do. They seemed to be the ones “playing nice” in that specific exchange.


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    September 7th, 2003
    at 1:14 pm

    I guess I was less than clear there. What I meant was that HSLDA does not consult with the various state homeschooling organizations before proposing federal legislation that will affect all. I happen to think that the lawyers at HSLDA are men (are there any women?) of integrity who are doing what they think is right for the community. I just wish they’d ask our opinions before filing the bill.


    Comment by
    Chris
    September 7th, 2003
    at 6:24 pm

    I think HSLDA acts in what they believe to be the best interest of their members, for the most part are politically conservative, Christian homeschoolers. Without geting into too many over reaching generalizations, I think that group has less fear of the consequences of federal government involvement than some other homeschoolers do.


    Comment by
    Skip Oliva
    September 7th, 2003
    at 7:44 pm

    Daryl, as I said to you privately, I think the HONDA bill is clearly unnecessary. In terms of opening the door to federal regulation, my point is that this bill, practically speaking, does not alter the status quo. The NEA will look for ways to destroy homeschooling regardless of what Congress finds. The NEA, as you well know, is not bound by facts or reason.

    As for HSLDA, it’s obvious that Mike Farris & Co. are just looking for a manufactured accomplishment to emphasize their political clout–just as any interest group does. The problem with men like Farris is that they focus exclusively on the political realm, and in the end that means a quest for power, just like the NEA.