Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » A NEW TREND
  • A NEW TREND

    Filed at 6:23 am under by dcobranchi

    and I’m not sure it’s a good one. I’m seeing more and more quotes like this:

    [S]he has a 3-year-old son, Farad, whom she home-schools.

    OK, of course she’s not legally “homeschooling,” in the sense that she is not bound by the homeschooling laws. What bothers me is the assumption that a 3-year-old home with mom has to be doing something. She’s not a stay-at-home mom; she’s a homeschooler. It’s almost like SAHMs have become an endangered species. What’s next? Are we going to see stories about 2-year-olds being homeschooled? About learning to walk and talk being part of a homeschooling program?

    Maybe it’s our fault. I’m beginning to think that the label “homeschooling” may be undesirable. What differentiates what that SAHM is doing from what we do? The age of her kid and being bound by the homeschool laws. But what if we suddenly got rid of all compulsory attendance laws? Would we suddenly stop being home educators? Legally, sure. No compulsory attendance law equates to no homeschooling law. But I can’t imagine too many of us would quit teaching ours at home. We would all be just “families” again. Some families have SAHMs and SAHDs. Some families send their kids to school. Others don’t. Some families would start out one way and change direction (possibly several times). But we’d all be just families.

    So, Daryl, what do you want? Do you want to get rid of the label? Yeah, I think I do. I think it may just be counter-productive. What do y’all think?

    13 Responses to “A NEW TREND”


    Comment by
    Chris
    October 24th, 2004
    at 9:20 am

    I think the problem is that homeschooling has become trendy. We are the educational flavor of the week. It’s cooler to say you homeschool, rather than to say you are a SAHM.

    Like I always say, homeschoolers area better off under the radar.


    Comment by
    J Aron
    October 24th, 2004
    at 11:52 am

    I think we are seeing more stories about SAHM’s homeschooling their three year olds because mandatory preschool is coming and 3 year olds will soon be considered homeschooled if they are home with mom or dad.


    Comment by
    Anonymous
    October 24th, 2004
    at 11:57 am

    It’s been about 30 years since being a sahm was acceptable, never mind desirable. If new parents *know* that they’re going to hs, it sounds way better to say, “I’m homeschooling my 2 year old.” rather than, “I don’t work, I just stay home.”


    Comment by
    traci
    October 24th, 2004
    at 12:12 pm

    Since the article requires registration I didn’t get to read it but I would like to speak to the homeschooling the preschooler issue. As past president of our local inclusive support group I’ve seen that alot of moms are starting to think about homeschooling when their children are around 2 years but aren’t quite sure yet. We get lots of inquiries about how to homeschool & what’s involved sometimes they come to a support meeting .

    Two is an age where the ave kids can really start to speak & interact begin to ask questions & are curious about everything in their world. Naturally Mom responds to the child w/ answers & information, finds this interaction & learning rewarding.

    By Ages three & four, alot of kids are on the preschool path. In my own experience my daughter & I slowly watched the neighborhood playmates enter preschool one by one as their mommies went back to work or had baby number two or three.
    I was constantly feeling under pressure by questions as Why wasn’t I going to work now that my daughter didn’t need me as much? Why don’t I put my daughter in preschool to give myself some free time? Shouldn’t I be worried about her not being socialized for Kindergarten ?etc….

    As my daughter aged out of the playgroups & watched her friends go to this place called preschool(not daycare as it should be called)she too was asking about when she could go to this place? why was she different?

    Her newly socialized preschool friends (when we had a chance to see them) were changing…. They weren’t as friendly to her anymore she was called a “baby” cause she didn’t go to preschool.
    I also saw signs of aggression in these kids (some that I’ve known since birth as the sweetest kids). They were now pushy, mean, unwilling to share, jealous. Often daycare(opps PRESCHOOL) for them started when their new baby sibling arrived.
    No surprise I think some of them did make the mental link that mommy sent them away to have more time w/ the new baby.( after all that is what mommy said to the other ladies) Other things mommy now complained about them was that they weren’t being potty trained fast enough for summer camp( which didn’t allow diapered children) & they fact that they often cried & were clingy to her as she dropped them at the PRESCHOOL door.

    Never once did I verbally question their choices in what they did w/ their kids.

    I looked around & was thinking yikes we’re just not fitting into the same life choices as the others moms & tots in the neighborhood. One day at the swimming pool when the moms were dicussing the Kindergarten choices for school… public, private.

    I verbalized that maybe I wanted to homeschool….. If we weren’t odd ducks before for having a 4 year old still at home we really took the cake as weirdos in the neighborhood with that statement.

    It was then that I ran not walked to my first homeschool support group meeting. Luckly for me our group DOES SUPPORT THE HOMESCHOOLING PRESCHOOL FAMILY!!!! We found a home. These wonderful ladies informed me that yes I’ve been homeschooling all along just teaching my daughter the basics that she needed for life & that continuing on w/ that & adding skills as she was ready for them was what homeschooling was all about. What started as talking grew to ABCs, then reading, writing & other language arts, Numbers & shapes became Math & geometry. Bugs in the park became science etc….

    Playgroup was filled w/ multi age kids from babes in arms to teens & not one of them called my daughter a baby or said that she couldn’t play beacause she was a girl or not in the same grade. It was wonderful. It became a way of life… actually it became an extention of OUR WAY OF LIFE.

    So in a way as parents we all start as homeschoolers just not all of us continue it. Maybe it’s because not all can recognize that fact. Our group has alot of new members every year that are Moms of 3 & 4 yr olds. That support is so critical to not being pressured into putting kids into Kindergarten.


    Comment by
    Andrea
    October 24th, 2004
    at 6:43 pm

    I called myself a homeschooler when my daughter was four simply because I knew that I intended to homeschool and it was good for friends and family to get used to the idea.

    We still aren’t bound by laws since she isn’t seven yet but we are “doing” kindergarten and have daily lesson plans so I do think that I am officially a homeschooler.


    Comment by
    kelbel
    October 25th, 2004
    at 12:39 am

    On the flip side, I’m hearing parents who send their children to daycare refer to it as “school”. I’m not talking about children who are enrolled in an actual preschool. I refer to parents of younger children who call daycare “school”.

    It bugs me. It does.

    Is there something about calling it “school” makes them feel better about sending the children there?


    Comment by
    Tim Haas
    October 25th, 2004
    at 7:58 am

    I feel personally responsible for this trend — I’ve been using the line “Everybody homeschools up to the age of five” for years now as a way reframing the issue for both nervous beginners and HS skeptics alike. I would then go on to qualify that statement, but apparently everyone has seized on the term and run off without the annotation.


    Comment by
    don
    October 25th, 2004
    at 9:32 am

    Interesting discussion. When our two oldest were preschool aged we did a lot of what would be considered home-education with them. Both were reading and doing basic math well before kindergarten age. We never planned any of it, but were just reponding to their natural desire to learn. And we never called it homeschooling. Now they are in 4th and 1st grades and are officially home-schooled, and our 4 yr. old wants to “do school” too. So she is also learning to read, doing basic math, etc. like her older siblings did at that age. Recently the kids have come up with their own term for what she does: pre-homeschooling.


    Comment by
    Brian Sassaman
    October 25th, 2004
    at 4:01 pm

    I personally believe that the more people homeschool, the better our country will be in coming generations.

    I heard a funny phrase from radio host Neal Boortz today, complaining about some Georgia DOT (Department of Transportation) employees as being the “saddest case[s] of government education induced illiteracy” – haha. Funny, yea, but true and destructive to our nation. The more we malign government schools the better.


    Comment by
    Anonymous
    October 25th, 2004
    at 6:00 pm

    Wow, Tim. I had no idea you had that much power and influence. I’m in awe.


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    October 25th, 2004
    at 6:12 pm

    I call “Foul!” If you’re going to get snarky, at least have the guts to sign your name.


    Comment by
    Tim Haas
    October 25th, 2004
    at 9:40 pm

    You’d be surprised. I invented the Internet too.


    Comment by
    Anonymous
    October 26th, 2004
    at 8:13 am

    fwiw, that was supposed to be humorous, Daryl, not snarky.