Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » 85.7 PERCENT
  • 85.7 PERCENT

    Filed at 10:53 am under by dcobranchi

    That’s what I scored on this sample of the Florida teacher’s test for K-6th grade (discounting the two unanswerable questions). I did have to guess a bit on the psychobabble ones. That being said, I’m still doing better than quite a few teachers in Florida. I read over the weekend that some have failed this test dozens of times.

    12 Responses to “85.7 PERCENT”


    Comment by
    Hearn
    December 15th, 2004
    at 11:22 am

    I got the same score . . . get out of my head! GET OUT OF MY HEAD!!!

    Although, to be honest, I guessed right on a couple of them. I know nothing about Piaget’s theory of cognitive development. My wife does, though.

    I wonder what the “failing” level is on this test? Under 70%?


    Comment by
    J Aron
    December 15th, 2004
    at 11:23 am

    I got three wrong (also discounting the two unanswerables)..and I don’t agree with the answer for #2 or #20.. the other edubabble ones I guessed at..
    85.7 isn’t a bad score…
    sheesh I kan bee a gud techur two!


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    December 15th, 2004
    at 11:29 am

    Yeah- I missed #2 also even though I knew what the “right” answer must be. I just refused to answer it that way. My other misses were #9 (which is open to debate) and #19 (the Piaget question).


    Comment by
    Joan
    December 15th, 2004
    at 2:53 pm

    I also got 85.7%.


    Comment by
    darby
    December 15th, 2004
    at 2:54 pm

    Number 2 (discounting the 2 unanswerables) was the only one I got “wrong” and frankly I strongly disagree with the right answer. If you are teaching reading, then I think the MOST important thing is to know what level your students are at. It’s not much of a shared reading experience if half the kids in your class can’t read it independantly, never mind how “culturally sensitive” your material is.
    Grrr…
    Anyway, I thought it was a pretty simple test (but then, I’m the kind of nerd who reads developmental psych texts for fun).
    😉


    Comment by
    Chris
    December 15th, 2004
    at 8:21 pm

    I missed #2 – because I refused to give them the answer they wanted. If you are teaching K-6 in an American school, your job is to teach the kids to read english, period.

    I guess I got lucky on the psycho-babble questions.

    15 & 16 were defective, part of the questions didn’t make it to the web.

    Where do I sign up to be a teacher?


    Comment by
    Rikki
    December 15th, 2004
    at 8:24 pm

    I missed number 3, but I honestly didn’t know that education was the majority of a state’s budget. Really makes me wonder how they could screw it up so badly with all that money currently going in that direction.
    Missed a couple others, but sorry, I don’t agree with what they think is important or appropriate for the given situations. If someone is breaking the rules why on earth would you interrupt class to start a discussion on what the rules should be instead of reminding the children to raise their hands if that’s what you desire? And another thing, who in the world is worried about cultural content being provided unless they know what reading level the child needs to start with?
    Still, I got an acceptable level, even for guessing the questions that didn’t have a missing graphical object. heh. I kud b a teecher!


    Comment by
    fortytwo
    December 16th, 2004
    at 9:33 am

    Wow, I’m a good guesser (either that or I have a natural affinity for psychobabble – horrors!) Aside from the two unanswerable ones (not THAT good a guesser), I got them all right.

    While I vehemently disagree with the so-called “right” answer to #2 (as well as some of the teaching technique q’s), I also have no problem whatsoever giving the answer they want to hear on stuff like this (the fact that that seems to be the most fluffy, feel-good, “trendy” choice available is scary). I had no knowledge of Piaget (or half the other education theory questions), but I’m a good test taker so I managed to fake it (an altogether useless skill in the real world, pity).

    It’s very disheartening that people who spent 4 years in college studying this stuff still can’t manage to pass the test when a bunch of random edu-blog readers can score so high.


    Comment by
    Adrian
    December 17th, 2004
    at 1:58 am

    I only missed 2 and 20, got everything else. Item 2 is a mutli-cultural trap question, and item 20 is a question to see if the teacher is child-centered enough. My guess is on the actual test there are enough of these types of questions to allow the test to filter out those who believe in traditional methods of education.


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    December 17th, 2004
    at 6:26 am

    But we were able to spot them a mile away and could have chosen to give the correct response if we wanted. The fact that we didn’t just proves that we’re ornery cusses taking a meaningless test. If a teaching certificate were on the line (and I wanted the job), I’d have answered #2 differently.


    Comment by
    Adrian
    December 18th, 2004
    at 1:01 am

    Daryl, I’m not sure I could have answered nos. 2 and 20 correctly even if something were on the line. I’ve had enough great teachers to know what’s right and wrong, and I’m not sure I could bring myself to answer or do otherwise.


    Comment by
    Independent George
    December 23rd, 2004
    at 1:54 pm

    Did everybody here get #2 and #20 wrong on purpose? I know which answers they were looking for, but still… ack!

    #20 is especially egregious to me. You’re trying to get kids to follow the rules and maintain order in the classroom, so the solution is to not only change the rules, but do it via brainstorming session?!! Yeah, that’ll teach them to wait for their turn and listen respectfully to other people.

    Must… control… fist of death!