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  • ANOTHER WWHE

    Filed at 5:28 pm under by dcobranchi

    OK, this one may be a little obscure. But a part of NCLB requires g-schools to provide military recruiters with contact information (including phone numbers) for their students. Why this might not be desirable:

    [Army recruiter] Sgt. Thomas Kelt left this message on that young man’s cell phone: “Hey Chris, this is Sgt. Kelt with the Army man. I think we got disconnected. Okay, I know you were on your cell probably and just had a bad connection or something like that. I know you didn’t hang up on me. Anyway, by federal law you got an appointment with me at 2 o’clock this afternoon at Greenspoint Mall, okay? That’s the Greenspoint Mall Army Recruiting Station at 2 o’clock. You fail to appear and we’ll have a warrant. Okay? So give me a call back.”

    Needless to say, threatening to have a kid arrested for refusing to talk to an army recruiter is not exactly proper procedure. Parents can opt out of the contact list. Cases like this lead me to believe that the list needs to be opt in.

    7 Responses to “ANOTHER WWHE”


    Comment by
    Jason
    May 11th, 2005
    at 7:59 pm

    Can anybody in the recruiter’s neighborhood actually confirm that this in fact happened? If it did, that recruiter is in serious trouble.


    Comment by
    Rikki
    May 11th, 2005
    at 10:32 pm

    Jason, on the website you can hear the message yourself. They’ve saved it.
    Scary tactics indeed.


    Comment by
    Jason
    May 12th, 2005
    at 9:07 am

    Apparently, both this incident and a similar incident (in which a recruiter incorrectly told an applicant that s/he could be prosecuted for refusing to get on the bus to the MEPS (Military Entry Processing Station) have led to an Army-wide recruiting stand down. (Note: ‘Stand down’ days are usually done for safety reasons. Aviation units, for example, will conduct a safety stand down after a serious mishap.)


    Comment by
    speedwell
    May 12th, 2005
    at 9:37 am

    Take it from a Houstonian…

    Once the famously abusive, zero-tolerance-Gestapo fanatics at Katy ISD, New Caney ISD, and Harris County get done with them, those kids’ll be licked into docility so well that they won’t even THINK to ask if what the government flunky says is true. They’ll be USED to being ordered to do things for no reason but that they’re told to with enough force. God help us (so to speak) if some goosestepper with a government job ever orders them to step into the boxcars.


    Comment by
    Valerie
    May 12th, 2005
    at 11:25 am

    Tell it to your elected representatives:
    — They’re the ones that made the NCLB law with all its provisions
    — They’re the ones that have ‘facilitated’ the war in Iraq
    — They’re the ones who control the military services

    usinfo...sk.htm
    ===============================================
    Certain criteria have governed American civil-military relations from the beginning of the nation. Louis Smith, a leading student of civil-military relations, has summarized them effectively. They include:

    — Civilian leadership of the executive branch of government. The national leadership is accountable to a popular majority through frequent and regular elections.

    — Civilian leadership of the professional military services and departments. The professional military heads of the army, the navy and the air force are subordinate to civilian departmental heads, who are appointed by the president and confirmed by Congress. In other words, the civilian executive stands at the head of the military chain of command, supported by civilian subordinates who oversee the day-to-day activities of the armed forces.

    — Statutory provisions to establish fundamental national security policies. Elected legislative representatives of the people enact laws that define the defense, organization and policies of the nation. The chief executive enforces these directives. In the United States, the Constitution provides basic guidelines, and the Congress passes legislation that defines the scope of military activity.

    — Judicial defense of civilian control. The judiciary prevents the military from compromising civil liberties, including those of the members of the armed services. In the United States, the Supreme Court is empowered to hear cases that involve military infringements on the rights of the citizenry.
    ===============================================

    I don’t excuse the recruiters who use these tactics, but they’re under the gun to produce and, like other humans, they can make some bad decisions.


    Comment by
    speedwell
    May 13th, 2005
    at 9:20 am

    “I don’t excuse the recruiters who use these tactics, but…”

    But you do, I see. That’s the whole point.

    This country would be a much better place if citizens didn’t excuse government employees on the grounds that the employees are “human” (meaning what, exactly? incompetent failures? I don’t think of “humans” that way) and make “mistakes.”

    You wouldn’t tolerate these criminal “mistakes” from anyone else who works for you–why tolerate it from “public servants?”


    Comment by
    Valerie
    May 13th, 2005
    at 6:51 pm

    Nah. I don’t excuse it.

    I’d approve of an appropriate punishment for the man; probably an Article 15. The tactic of scaring kids into enlisting with empty threats is wrong and embarrassing.

    My point was that the recruiters are in the position of having difficulty fulfilling the government’s requirements by the government’s own actions. The sergeant shouldn’t have done it, of course (an action I would hope that he rues), but from what I’ve heard, the pressure can be strong and there’s no resigning from the job. “Humans,” when stuck between a rock and a hard place, can ‘act inappropriately.’

    Btw, I see “humans” as beings who make a variety of decisions from horrible to great, and all shades of gray in-between. The decision to scare a kid with a lie (which I’m not sure is criminal since it resulted in no action — but I’m not a lawyer so I could well be wrong) to try to fill a quota was a dead stupid one. Military recruiters have enough of a credibility gap without making stupid threats on a recording.