Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » ANYBODY WATCH DR. PHIL?
  • ANYBODY WATCH DR. PHIL?

    Filed at 1:42 pm under by dcobranchi

    He’s looking for a few good home educators. (via HSWatch)

    11 Responses to “ANYBODY WATCH DR. PHIL?”


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 3:45 pm

    I thought about applying.


    Comment by
    sam
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 4:43 pm

    I have actually watched a Dr. Phil episode in which he expressed support for homeschooling up to the typical middle school years. He suggested school after that due to the more intense science and math that are a fear of many hs families, and what he said was fairly positive and made sense in a way. As hs families, we tend to see those subjects as less difficult than many people, so his position was understandable for someone not familiar with what we see in hs kids being able to easily learn science and math at any level.


    Comment by
    COD
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 4:51 pm

    Michelle got an email from a friend yesterday suggsting that we sign up.

    I don’t think so. If I don’t get to be on ESPN she doesn’t get to be on Dr Phil 😉

    I kid – she has zero interest in it anyway.


    Comment by
    JJ Ross
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 6:14 pm

    I’m with Sam on this. I saw that episode and interpreted Dr. Phil’s advice the same way. Although, based on this reported explosion of desperate parents bidding up elite private tutors now, we might assume it’s become a universal concern far beyond homeschooling, and that schooling families are the ones really sweating math and science!


    Comment by
    JJ Ross
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 7:05 pm

    “Emphasizing the availability of CCs” could be weakened by this story in today’s NYT though . . . sigh.


    Comment by
    JJ Ross
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 8:15 pm

    Interesting perspective, thanks Tammy — I was thinking more that it weakens the community colleges themselves, makes them seem like dumping grounds with nothing much good to offer, and that may hurt their freedoms and funding . . .but maybe my take on it is colored by having a teen HEK who did take that college placement exam at 15, who has no desire to take anybody’s version of “remedial” math in any case . . . she’s there because she loves English, the arts and humanities and doesn’t give a flip about the 4-year admission requirements or diplomas at this point. She probably doesn’t fit anything this story was “about” and so I’m still not sure what to make of it.

    But from a public/political point of view rather than a mom POV, I’d say it isn’t good news for the CCs.


    Comment by
    COD
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 8:17 pm

    The last thing Dr. Phil wants is a rational liberal male to debate homeschooing with. I’ll bet money the families that make it on air will be the worst examples of the typical HSer stereotypes.


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 8:48 pm

    I’ll see what (if anything) happens:

    We appreciate your interest in being on the show and thank you for sharing your story. Because of the number of responses we receive each day, unfortunately we cannot answer every e-mail. Be assured that we do, however, read each submission carefully. If a producer is interested in following up with you, you may receive a phone call or an e-mail response.


    Comment by
    Tammy Takahashi
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 8:55 pm

    JJ,

    Ah, I wasn’t thinking from that perspective. Interesting points!

    I think that CCs have long been considered “dumping grounds” for kids who couldn’t make it into 4-years. What I see from the NYT article is that CC’s *are* worthy places of learning, and that the teens that end up there straight from high school aren’t ready for them.

    CC’s will always turn out less successful students than their 4-year counterparts, and will always attract, on average, less achieved students, simply because they are not selective. The comparison is like the difference between public and private schools. The kids who go into private schools are always going to be more “ready”, on average, than the kids who go to public. This is true at all levels of education.

    CC’s are getting more and more kids who aren’t ready for college level courses. That can be a bad thing for CC’s, or it can put CC’s on the forefront, using them as an example of what high schools should be. But it seems to me, that overall, CC’s are considered to be a more acceptable path to a 4-year than it has been previously. And from a teacher’s perspective, it’s becoming (or even has been for a while) the preferred place to be a professor, even for those with Ph.D.s. What that means, is better teachers, who want to be there, and aren’t basing their tenure on research. Even from a political and social perspective, it seems to me that CC’s are really the model of what education pre-BA should be like.


    Comment by
    Spunky
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 9:23 pm

    Someone on my blog suggested DAryl and I both do it. That would about cover the homeschool blogosphere and a lot of free PR.


    Comment by
    COD
    September 2nd, 2006
    at 10:01 pm

    If it’s Daryl and Spunky vs Dr Phil and his expert, my money is on Spunky and Daryl.