Utterly Meaningless » Blog Archive » GIVE ME A BREAK!
  • GIVE ME A BREAK!

    Filed at 11:39 pm under by dcobranchi

    This has to be the dumbest reason ever cited in support of the g-schools:

    In other words, because our public schools are a place where we develop a set of common stories, myths and experiences _ George Washington crossing the Delaware, Betsy Ross sewing the first flag, even the fear of being sent to the principal _ they encourage a sense of a shared heritage that helps pull our country together.

    Homeschooling and vouchers for private schools _ places that allow the teaching of the things that Roger Moran believes _ tend to pull us apart. All in all, our public-school system has served us well; it would be better to repair its faults than to abandon it.

    So, an ability to believe in fairy tales is what holds us together? And the g-schools are the enablers. Now, perhaps, I understand why half the country still thinks Saddam was behind the attacks five years ago today.

    9 Responses to “GIVE ME A BREAK!”


    Comment by
    Scott W. Somerville
    September 12th, 2006
    at 5:29 am

    See? This is why the g-schools SHOULD teach Creationism. The only reason not to is that pesky little First Amendment.

    By the way, Daryl… I haven’t heard a peep out of you on Harry Reid’s threat to ABC’s license to broadcast. What’s your take on that? Is he over the line, or just defending the truth?


    Comment by
    Daryl Cobranchi
    September 12th, 2006
    at 9:16 am

    It’s politics (from both sides), of course. I’m not worked up on this as a First Amendment issue, though. The networks don’t own the airwaves. They’re in a highly regulated business, and have agreed to play by the rules. ABC/Disney appears to have crossed the line into partisan spin. I expect the Republicans would scream bloody murder if CBS recruited Jon Stewart to be the news anchor during the next GOP convention.

    I didn’t watch the Clinton hit-piece, but ABC/Disney is apparently in hot water over factual errors. American Airlines is theatening to sue.


    Comment by
    Nance Confer
    September 12th, 2006
    at 9:44 am

    Jon Stewart to be the news anchor during the next GOP convention.
    *****
    Ooooh, what a delicious idea. 🙂

    For any convention coverage.

    It could only be an improvement.

    Nance


    Comment by
    Jeanne
    September 12th, 2006
    at 10:35 am

    I am interested in the idea of common myths and fairy tales of our culture as a positive and important thing. However, I’d put my money on homeschoolers for doing a better job at transmitting culture’s (cultures’?) important myths and iconic happenings. I know at our house, we are keeping the Family Dinner alive, and my kids are pretty well-versed in the whole Hansel & Gretel & Co. dark side, which many of their school mates seem never to have heard of (and unfortunately, maybe too many of them experience first hand in a way that is beyond the metaphor). And, they know many cultures’ Creation stories, including our family’s Christian stories of Creation. We somehow also manage (enough of) the popular culture of Monday Night Football, red state-blue state, etc., tho’ I am proud to say I have never seen an episode of Survivor. Instead, that is the time of night I am reading “Wind in the Willows” to my son (that Toad is always getting in some kind of trouble!)

    The idea that g-schools provide some shared common experience that binds us is not new. Back when there were three networks and that created a “global village,” we were told the same thing about television. Television executives and some media scholars understandably have had a hard time dealing with the splintering of market share and often lamented the loss of “shared experiences” brought on by the multitude of “channels.”

    It’s not surprising that those who support or enjoy a g-school monopoly would embrace a similar lament. We homeschoolers are closer to the DIY (Do It Yourself) network or HGTV, and we take viewers away from the Big Networks – the G-Schools. The fact that we can still pass along “shared experiences” and “common stories” (see: internets/support groups/community events/politics/newspapers/literature, etc.) runs counter to their expectations and understanding of homeschooling, but g-school stakeholders can promote that potential “loss” as another angle to hang on to the power of monopoly.

    My youngest son’s recent set-up of a lemonade stand in our new home-town resulted in a letter to the editor (not from me!) and his picture in the paper. He was praised (as was I, as “Involved Mother”) to the hilt for his little entrepreneurial venture. My feeling? He was transmitting one of the romantic, nostalgic myths/pictures that my new small town has of itself. It was seen as a Big Deal that this old-fashioned Mayberry-esque was understood by newcomers and put out there for all the town to enjoy. From non-homeschoolers, we got the comment (again), “You don’t SEEM like homeschoolers.” Homeschoolers understood that sometimes a lemonade stand is just a lemonade stand. If we can provide a little Americana as a side benefit, we’re happy to oblige.


    Comment by
    JJ Ross
    September 12th, 2006
    at 11:18 am

    So half believe that, while a third think America herself was behind it, Daryl. Seems to me it’s not the ability to believe in fairy tales that’s ever at issue but WHOSE fairy tales we’ll tell the kiddies . . .

    School wants only the textbook version, Church wantys the Bible stories. Then home ed moms like Jeanne and me specialize in comparative story-telling and are raising experts! 🙂


    Comment by
    Eric
    September 12th, 2006
    at 8:46 pm

    This cracked me up:
    “…George Washington crossing the Delaware, Betsy Ross sewing the first flag…”

    Which homeschooler in first grade hasn’t learned about this? Maybe that was all that Mr. Crisp could remember about the “sense of heritage” he developed in public school when not listening to myths in third grade.

    I would agree that knowledge of our country’s history can help to give us a sense of patriotism, but history is not ignored in either my homeschool or in the education of my homeschooling friends.

    What ever happened to public school and education? Did John use this article as an attempt to mask the fact that home and private-schoolers in general tend to much more intelligent and well-rounded than the typical public-schooler by pretending that school is supposed to be a place where kids come to “develop common stories”?

    I always thought that homeschoolers were brighter because they received superior educations. But now that I think about it, any education is superior to none at all.

    John M. Crisp needs homeschooled.

    God bless,
    Eric


    Comment by
    CJ
    September 13th, 2006
    at 8:05 am

    My translation of that: “Become part of the machine. Believe all the same thing. Know all the same stories. Look the same, act the same, think the same. So if one fails, we all fail, so no one’s feelings are hurt. Because if you are different, you are wrong, we must all be the same!!”


    Comment by
    Nance Confer
    September 13th, 2006
    at 9:57 am

    And Texas agrees with you, Scott!

    No pesky First Amendment. No worries about separation.

    Just go ahead and preach your heart out.

    Nance

    tinyur.../ebar9

    Study: Majority of Bible courses not academic

    10:16 PM CDT on Tuesday, September 12, 2006

    Associated Press

    AUSTIN – The majority of Bible courses being offered as electives at Texas high schools are devotional and sectarian in their approach and do not teach about the Bible in a historical or literary context as required under state law a new study has found, according to a published report.

    . . .

    The majority of the courses promote one faith perspective over all others and push an ideological agenda that is hostile to religious freedom, science and public education, according to the 76-page report to be released Wednesday.

    The Texas Freedom Network surveyed the more than 1,000 school districts in the state to determine which offered Bible electives. Mark Chancey, a biblical studies professor at Southern Methodist University, then analyzed the curriculums, going back five years, from 25 districts, about 3 percent of the total, that offered them as electives in 2005-2006.

    The report was a joint effort by Chancey and the Education Fund of the Texas Freedom Network, a liberal watchdog group.

    The study found that the vast majority of the electives are explicitly devotional and have an almost exclusively Christian, usually Protestant, perspective. It also found that most of the Bible courses are taught by teachers with no academic training in biblical, religious or theological studies and who are not very familiar with the issues of separation of church and state.

    “We stand with parents who believe that the Bible is a great way to teach students about the importance of religion in history and literature. But we think pressure groups have hijacked a good idea and the end result is that these courses can betray families’ faith in our public schools by teaching courses with a narrow religious perspective above all others,” said TFN President Kathy Miller.

    . . .


    Comment by
    JJ Ross
    September 13th, 2006
    at 12:04 pm

    American culture is carelessly and ruthlessly pervasive, viral even, and transmits itself around the world without “school” at all needed to do it, insinuating into other cultures to the great alarm of cultural defenders in THOSE countries.

    So how could anyone worry that our own kids wouldn’t get enough of it growing up right here?

    The only reasonable answer is that no one could reasonably BE worried about tha. More likely it’s the opposite worry behind all this rhetoric, a desire to prevent the transmission of that culture any way possible!

    More sock puppetry? You decide . . .