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  • WHO ARE “THEY”?

    Filed at 10:13 pm under by dcobranchi

    Did Shortt make the claim? And what exactly does being responsible for them mean?

    Houston lawyer Bruce Shortt refers to himself as an ordinary guy who “lives in flyover country.” But he has an unusual pastime that has attracted both critics and supporters: He’s working to encourage parents to “leave behind” public schools.

    Shortt said if parents take their Christian beliefs seriously, they will do everything possible to ensure their children get a thoroughly Christian education. A growing segment of the faith community is joining Shortt’s call for an exodus, saying the public school system is hostile to their values and unresponsive to their concerns.

    They claim to be responsible for most of the 1 million children nationwide now being homeschooled.

    7 Responses to “WHO ARE “THEY”?”


    Comment by
    Kim
    December 1st, 2006
    at 10:41 pm

    I guess that explains the voices in my head telling me to join the over 1 million people nationwide. Haha.


    Comment by
    Charity
    December 2nd, 2006
    at 9:19 am

    Ooh, ooh, a Saturday morning grammar quiz! I believe the “they” refers to “A growing segment of the faith community” from the previous paragraph.

    Anyhoo, I always feel so conflicted about these kinds of articles. I am a conservative Protestant and I guess that our curriculum reflects our worldview, at least in the way that everything we do does, but I took my kids out of school for completely unrelated reasons. The public schools were lacking academically, had cut out recess almost completely, forcing my two active little boys to sit still all day, and were stifling my children’s love for learning.

    I understand the feeling that schools are hostile to Christian values, though I guess it depends where you live to some degree, and I think that is a good reason to homeschool – BUT, I do not want homeschooling to be seen as a religious freedom or religious movement because then it will draw the ire of the anti-religions zealots – those who would rather take away the rights of everyone then allow one child to receive a Christian home education.


    Comment by
    Andrea R. in Missouri
    December 2nd, 2006
    at 11:13 am

    How do they explain me? I’m an atheist liberal homeschooler. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone either. I know several other families in town that fit that description.


    Comment by
    Nance Confer
    December 2nd, 2006
    at 12:24 pm

    You are not alone, Andrea. 🙂

    Nance


    Comment by
    SLM
    December 2nd, 2006
    at 12:47 pm

    It’s kind of wimpy to go around assuring every non-religious person and group that you’re not homeschooling for religious reasons and they should therefore leave you alone. We should be left alone because homeschooling is legal, regardless of why we choose to do it. So what if someone thinks you might be a religious nut. Your friends will know you’re safely secular or an edgy atheist or whatever. Maybe you could get some t-shirts made up to explain how unlike those other homeschoolers you are, then everyone will like you.


    Comment by
    Nance Confer
    December 2nd, 2006
    at 2:46 pm

    Is that the point of all this? If you’re a “real” or “good” hser, everyone will like you? 🙂

    Nance


    Comment by
    Charity
    December 2nd, 2006
    at 3:48 pm

    I don’t know if the SLM comment was directed at me, but if so, I guess I was not clear in my comment. I am a religious nut, but I would be homeschooling anyway. I want that freedom protected because it is my right to homeschool. I do not want the religious nut part to get the anti-religion zealots’ undies in a bunch, resulting in their lobbying to outlaw homeschooling. Thus the conflict about this type of article.