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  • HEADS UP: NC

    Filed at 10:51 am under by dcobranchi

    HB 253 would allow HEKs to play public school sports. I believe I can support passage as enough states have shown that this can work without imposing restrictions on the homeschooling community in general.

    I do have one problem with the bill as written:

    Assessment of academic progress. – A home schooled student shall demonstrate any required academic eligibility in all subjects taken in the home schooled program by a method of evaluation agreed upon by the parent and the school principal.

    I’m not sure that doesn’t just grant the principal veto power. What if the parent and the principal can’t agree? What if the principal requires that the HEK pass the EOC (end of class) tests?

    5 Responses to “HEADS UP: NC”


    Comment by
    Nance Confer
    March 28th, 2011
    at 9:54 am

    Yep. You want to play ball, you have to play ball. And take any related classes normally required — say there’s a health class required to participate in a sport. And do it on their schedule.

    Have fun! 🙂


    Comment by
    JJ
    March 28th, 2011
    at 2:14 pm

    What’s the method/s of evaluating academics already established for homeschooling in law? Betting that any of those will be accpetable to prioncipals (and successfully appealable to a higher authority if not.)


    Comment by
    Daryl P Cobranchi
    March 28th, 2011
    at 3:15 pm

    In NC there is none. We have to test annually, but there is no reporting requirement and no minimum score.


    Comment by
    JJ
    March 28th, 2011
    at 8:51 pm

    Okay, my fallback argument: principals usually go the other direction when it comes to sports eligibility, at least in the South. 😉

    So HS parents trying to get an average not-amazing sports player into the program, simply suggest the principal is wise not to set any requirements for one hs kid that would come back to bite them later when some big, kinesthetically gifted kid willing to come play for that school but is in need of, shall we say, more academic flexibility?


    Comment by
    Nance Confer
    March 29th, 2011
    at 8:00 am

    How high could the hurdle be for ps kids to play sports? (See how I used a sports thing there!)

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